Sunday, March 29, 2015
FAIRFIELD-SUISUN, CALIFORNIA
99 CENTS

Obama: Child migrants ‘urgent humanitarian’ issue

By
June 04, 2014 |

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama on Monday described a surge in unaccompanied immigrant children caught trying to cross the Mexican border as an “urgent humanitarian situation,” as the White House asked Congress for an extra $1.4 billion in federal money to cope. Obama said the U.S. will temporarily house the children at two military bases.

Obama appointed the head of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, Craig Fugate, to be in charge of the situation.

In its new estimates, the government said as many as 60,000 children, mostly from Central America, could be caught this year trying to cross the Mexican border illegally, costing the U.S. more than $2.28 billion to house, feed and transport the children to shelters or reunite them with relatives already living in the United States. The new estimate is about $1.4 billion more than the government asked for in Obama’s budget request sent to Congress earlier this year.

In the last eight months alone, 47,000 children have been apprehended at the Southwest Border.

Obama described the growing humanitarian issue at the border in a presidential memorandum Monday that outlined a government-wide response led by Fugate.

Obama’s director of domestic policy, Cecilia Munoz, said the number of children traveling alone has been on the rise since 2009, but the increase was larger than last year. Munoz said the group also now includes more girls and larger numbers of children younger than 13.

“All of these things are contributing to the sense of urgency,” Munoz said. “These are children who have gone through a harrowing experience alone. We’re providing for their proper care.”

The growth has surpassed the system’s capacity to process and house the children. Last month, the federal government opened an emergency operations center at a border headquarters in South Texas to help coordinate the efforts and the Office of Refugee Resettlement, a division of the Health and Human Services Department, turned to the Defense Department for the second time since 2012 to help house children in barracks at Lackland Air Force Base near San Antonio.

Mark Greenberg, an assistant secretary at the Health and Human Services Department, said about 1,000 children were being housed at the Texas base and as many as 600 others could soon be housed at a U.S. Navy base in Southern California.

The number of children found trying to cross the Mexican border without parents has skyrocketed in recent years. Between 2008 and 2011, the number of children landing in the custody of Refugee Resettlement fluctuated between 6,000 and 7,500 per year. In 2012 border agents apprehended 13,625 unaccompanied children and that number surged even more – to over 24,000 – last year. The total is expected to exceed 60,000 this year.

More than 90 percent of those sheltered by the government are from Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador, many driven north by pervasive violence and poverty in their home countries. They are held in agency-contracted shelters while a search is conducted for family, a sponsor or a foster parent who can care for them through their immigration court hearings, where many will apply for asylum or other special protective status. Border Patrol agents have said that smugglers are increasingly notifying authorities once they get children across the Rio Grande so that they can be picked up.

Rampant crime and poverty across Central America and a desire to reunite with parents or other relatives are thought to be driving many of the young immigrants. Munoz said Monday the administration is aware of false rumors that have circulated that migrant children who get to this country would be automatically allowed to stay here or benefit from some future immigration reform legislation.

Migrant kids remain in removal proceedings even after they’re reunited with their parents here, though many have been able to win permission from a judge to stay in the U.S.

The Office of Management and Budget said in a two-page letter to Sen. Barbara Mikulski, the chairwoman of the Senate Appropriations Committee, last month that the increase in children trying to cross the border alone could cost the government as much as $2.28 billion. The administration originally asked Congress for $868 million for the “Unaccompanied Alien Children” program run by Health and Human Services, the same amount Congress approved last year.

Brian Deese, deputy director of the budget office, said the Homeland Security Department would also need an extra $166 million to help pay overtime costs for Customs and Border Protection officers and agents, contract services for care of the children and transportation costs.

A House appropriations subcommittee voted last week to add $77 million to the original request. Deese sent the letter to Mikulski a day after the House subcommittee vote.

The Associated Press

The Associated Press

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | 14 comments

The Daily Republic does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

  • Salty DogJune 03, 2014 - 11:18 am

    More of my tax money going down the drain to help people that break the law. Only in America do we help illegals that freak the law.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • patrickJune 03, 2014 - 11:29 am

    just give California to mexico and be done with it.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • HuckleberryJune 03, 2014 - 1:04 pm

    Obama refuses to secure the border and Brown has done away with any immigration laws in CA so they are coming here in record number because they can. Yet, Calilfornians love Brown except his immigration policy oh and there is the bullet train billions and shipping water from the north to the south. Teachers love him but actually they should love we citizens that keep voting in new bonds and taxes for a state that is taxed highest only second to New York. Did I mention that 98% of the people coming into CA are immigrants.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • rlw895June 03, 2014 - 1:13 pm

    EVERBODY coming into California to live are immigrants. Do you mean from foreign countries?

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • rlw895June 03, 2014 - 1:18 pm

    Does anybody have a better idea that doesn't result in dead children?

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Salty DogJune 03, 2014 - 4:31 pm

    rlw I have a better idea. Lets not give any one in the country illegally any thing like free schooling, free money in the form of welfare, social Security, disability, free medical, free legal advice on how to stay in the country. Remember if you come in the country illegally you are breaking the law.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • JagJune 03, 2014 - 10:41 pm

    we tried that in 1994 it was called prop 187 and it passed only to be stop by the courts

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • JagJune 03, 2014 - 10:55 pm

    Why are we apprehending these people we should be catching them and releasing within 8 hours back on their side and isn’t it funny the numbers started to raise in 2008,

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • rlw895June 03, 2014 - 11:06 pm

    Isn't apprehending and catching the same thing? And what is the "side" they go to after 8 hours? Who takes them? On our "side" they don't necessarily get to stay, but they get cared for until their situation is resolved. I'm still curious about how they get across Mexico.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • rlw895June 03, 2014 - 1:22 pm

    Something major is going on to see a jump in numbers like that. The problems in Central America are no worse that they were a few years ago, I don't believe. Either the apprehension rate has gone up or someone in Mexico has gotten a business in transporting children across that country going.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Salty DogJune 03, 2014 - 4:36 pm

    rlw Are you trying to pull our leg or is it that you just don't get it. Obama wants as many illegals in the country as he can get so he can make them citizens and get them voting democratic.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • rlw895June 03, 2014 - 10:47 pm

    No...I don't think that's it.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • HuckleberryJune 04, 2014 - 4:17 pm

    Wouldn't it be nice if RLW cared as much about the children in the US. The ones in fostercare that are passed from place to place. The hungry ones that parents cannot find jobs. We do not take care of the US citizens.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • rlw895June 04, 2014 - 4:27 pm

    I care just as much, but this story isn't about that.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
.

Solano News

Vanden High library project nears completion

By Bill Hicks | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
Vanden girls end stellar season

By Brian Arnold | From Page: C1, 1 Comment | Gallery

Cheers for Jupiter – and roller derby

By Brad Stanhope | From Page: A2, 2 Comments

 
Red Cross volunteers help assemble first aid kits

By Bill Hicks | From Page: A3 | Gallery

PG&E helps replace stolen equipment

By Bill Hicks | From Page: A3

 
Justin-Siena names new principal

By Bill Hicks | From Page: A3

 
Vacaville police make arrest after pursuit

By Bill Hicks | From Page: A3, 3 Comments | Gallery

Vacaville bridal, quinceanera show a hit

By Susan Hiland | From Page: A5

 
Event benefits child who attends Cambridge School

By Susan Hiland | From Page: A5 | Gallery

Free paper shredding option returns to Fairfield

By Susan Hiland | From Page: A5 | Gallery

 
Best barometer of investment success: Wealth

By Mark Sievers | From Page: B8

 
Tips on hydrozoning your garden

By Tina Saravia | From Page: B8, 2 Comments

 
Fairfield police log: March 27, 2015

By Susan Hiland | From Page: A12, 2 Comments

 
Suisun City police log: March 27, 2015

By Susan Hiland | From Page: A12

.

US / World

Crash victim’s father calls for more focus on pilot welfare

By The Associated Press | From Page: A1

 
Experts: Sex bias case will embolden women despite verdict

By The Associated Press | From Page: A1

 
Popular Yosemite National Park lookout opens early in season

By The Associated Press | From Page: A9

 
Some British Airways frequent flier accounts miles breached

By The Associated Press | From Page: A11

7 shot and injured at Florida spring break house party

By The Associated Press | From Page: A11

 
Boko Haram kills 39, legislator, disrupting Nigeria election

By The Associated Press | From Page: A11

Official: Al-Shabab siege at Somali hotel ends, 24 dead

By The Associated Press | From Page: A11

 
 
Bird flu found in a top Minnesota turkey producing county

By The Associated Press | From Page: A11

Islamic fighters led by al-Qaida in Syria seize major city

By The Associated Press | From Page: A13

 
.

Living

Today in History: March 29, 2015

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

 
Community Calendar: March 29, 2015

By Susan Hiland | From Page: A2

Pope finds popularity and dissent at 2-year mark

By The Associated Press | From Page: C3

 
Truth does not change

By The Rev. Art Zacher | From Page: C3, 9 Comments

Horoscopes: March 29, 2015

By Holiday Mathis | From Page: B8

 
Daughter choses stepdad over father to walk her down the aisle

By Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar | From Page: B8

.

Entertainment

PUBLISHERS WEEKLY BEST-SELLERS

By The Associated Press | From Page: A10

 
Second Julie Andrews memoir expected in 2017

By The Associated Press | From Page: A10

Chrissie Hynde memoir coming in September

By The Associated Press | From Page: A10

 
TVGrid

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B12

.

Sports

 
Warriors beat Bucks 108-95, clinch top seed in West

By The Associated Press | From Page: B1

Wisconsin heads to Final Four after 85-78 win over Arizona

By The Associated Press | From Page: B1

 
Burns scores winner in SO to lift Sharks past Flyers, 3-2

By The Associated Press | From Page: B1

 
Jenest pitches SCC baseball team to shutout of Contra Costa

By Daily Republic staff | From Page: B2

AP sources: Texas fires coach Barnes after 17 years

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

 
Kazmir, Quintana both strong; A’s beat White Sox 10-4

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

Zunino homers twice, but Giants rally to edge Mariners 9-8

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

 
Gordon, Earnhardt among the winners and fans of Martinsville

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

Prince Bishop wins Dubai World Cup, California Chrome 2nd

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

 
Serena Williams easily wins opening match at Miami Open

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

Power leads Penske sweep in qualifying for IndyCar opener

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

 
Revolution win first of season, beating Earthquakes 2-1

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

Jimmy Walker leads hometown Texas Open

By The Associated Press | From Page: B3

 
.

Business

A glance at women in leadership roles in business worldwide

By The Associated Press | From Page: B8

 
For business, more women in charge means bigger profits

By The Associated Press | From Page: B8 | Gallery

US drillers scrambling to thwart OPEC threat

By The Associated Press | From Page: B8 | Gallery

 
Test trial to use computer servers to heat homes

By The Associated Press | From Page: B14

.

Obituaries

Betty Mason

By Nancy Green | From Page: A4

 
Tiffany Lyn (Helzer) Kemp

By Nancy Green | From Page: A4

Richard F. Coleman

By Nancy Green | From Page: A4

 
James Lee Lewis

By Nancy Green | From Page: A4

Helen Kalis

By Nancy Green | From Page: A4

 
Carol A. Vose

By Nancy Green | From Page: A4

.

Comics