Iran opens first state-run alcohol rehab center

By From page A11 | August 02, 2014

TEHRAN, Iran — Iran has opened the country’s first, state-run rehab and treatment center for alcoholism, an Iranian semi-official news agency reported on Friday.

According to the report by ISNA, the center was inaugurated at the Tehran University’s Medical School. One of the physicians at the center, Dr. Mohammad Reza Sargolzaiee, was quoted as saying that the center opened “following an increase in alcohol use among Iranians.”

Drinking alcohol is illegal for Muslims under Iran’s strict Islamic teachings but there is open violation of the law. And even though there is widespread consumption of alcohol, there are no firm statistics available on how prevalent alcoholism is in the officially booze-free nation.

In February 2013, Iran’s police chief Esmaeil Ahmadi-Moqaddam said that there are about 200,000 people in Iran addicted to alcohol.

The year before, a Tehran official Abbas Ali Nasehi said Iran has about 2 million drug addicts, some of whom “are also addicted to alcohol.”

Most of Iran’s drug users are addicted to opium, the raw material for heroin.


The Associated Press

The Associated Press


Discussion | 1 comment

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  • BobAugust 02, 2014 - 7:43 am

    The front door says it's for alcohol treatment, go through the door and they give you a blindfold and lead you to a post. Easy to quit in Arab countries. You must bring your own ammo though

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