Sunday, April 20, 2014
FAIRFIELD-SUISUN, CALIFORNIA
99 CENTS

Idaho couple seeks resolution to lost pilot’s fate

BOISE, Idaho — For nearly 50 years, the family of Capt. Harry Cecil Moore assumed that he’d been killed in the Korean War.

Then in 2002, the family received a shock: The Air Force pilot might have survived and ended up a prisoner of war in the Soviet Union.

For the past decade, Moore’s brother and widow – who is now the brother’s wife – have been on a mission to find out what happened, especially since the Department of Defense has offered them little information.

They have learned that hundreds, and possibly thousands, of other U.S. service members from four wars also might have been held captive by the Soviets.

The Moores fly an American flag and a POW/MIA flag at their Eagle home. They say they love their country, and it pains these patriotic Americans to know that their government hasn’t been truthful with the public about POWs.

“The story has to be told,” said Bob Moore. “It isn’t right to desert our people after saying ‘we leave no one behind.’ “

Harry Moore grew up in West Virginia and joined the Army Air Corps in World War II. The first time he was shot down was Oct. 27, 1944, in China. He was 20.

For 51 days he walked through mountains, dodging gunfire and bombs – 16 hours a day, at one point with the Chinese army, surviving on rice and dog meat.

He was discharged, returned to West Virginia and decided to re-enlist. In 1948, just before shipping out to the Philippines, he married his longtime girlfriend, Lois Gehringer.

She soon joined him in the Philippines. Their daughter was born there in July 1950.

A few weeks later, Lois got word that Moore had been killed in action. Later that day, she was told it was a mistake: Moore had not flown that day.

Alone in a foreign country with a new baby, Lois was distraught. When Moore got sent to Korea, Lois and Jana returned to West Virginia.

In June 1951, Lois got a telegram telling her Moore had been shot down.

It was no mistake this time.

Moore was shot down on June 1, 1951, while piloting an F-51 Mustang – in 1948, the newly created Air Force had renamed the popular P-51 fighter – over the South China Sea, just off the west coast of North Korea. He was reported as missing in action.

On Dec. 31, 1953, the Air Force notified Lois that Harry was presumed dead and was listed as killed in action.

Lois decided she had to move on with her life. She left West Virginia and moved with her daughter and brother to California.

She connected there with Harry’s brother, Bob. They reminisced about Harry and grew closer. In 1954, they married. Bob raised Jana as his own daughter, and he and Lois had a daughter of their own, Nancy. They raised their family and owned a successful medical manufacturing business, and in 1996, they retired to Star.

In August 2002, Lois received a Federal Express package from the U.S. Air Force.

In it, a July 19, 2002, memo to the U.S. Air Force Missing Persons Branch from the Department of Defense Prisoner of War/Missing Personnel Office read: “(I)t is possible that Capt. Harry C. Moore survived his shoot-down incident and may have been interrogated by Soviet officials. His fate afterwards remains unknown.”

The Moores were shocked. “We thought, goodness gracious, there is still hope he could be alive,” said Bob Moore.

“For 50 years we had closure. It was all done. We couldn’t do anything else. He was dead and that was it. Then, 2002 changed the whole scenario. Now we have uncertainty. He may have been suffering for all that time in some Russian prison.”

Lois talks tearfully about the years, the decades Harry might have been imprisoned, wondering what happened to his family, whether he was going to be rescued, whether he would ever hear from his country.

It’s those questions about Moore and other POWs that motivate the Moores to keep trying to find out what happened.

In March 1954, the U.S. Air Force asked the CIA for assistance in finding U.S. servicemen in Communist custody: “An unknown but apparently substantial number of U.S. military personnel captured in the course of the Korean War are still being held prisoners by the Communist Forces. These individuals will not necessarily be detained in North Korea or Manchuria, but may be held elsewhere within the Soviet orbit.”

Despite this official plea, and numerous reports and first-hand accounts spanning World War II, Korea, Vietnam and the Cold War, the U.S. government maintained that no “credible evidence” existed that U.S. personnel were held captive by the Soviets.

In late 1991, the U.S. Senate Select Committee on POW/MIA Affairs chaired by Sen. John Kerry forced the Pentagon to declassify more than 1 million pages of documents. Its primary focus was Vietnam POWs, but the committee also examined reports of World War II, Korean War and Cold War POWs.

In November 1992, Kerry said Russian President Boris Yeltsin had admitted that some Americans were imprisoned in the former Soviet Union after World War II, others interrogated during the Korean War, and “perhaps a dozen airmen” imprisoned during the Cold War.

The committee’s 1,233-page report in January 1993 found “strong evidence that some unaccounted for American POWs from the Korean Conflict were transferred to the former Soviet Union in the early 1950s.”

In 1993, the US. secretary of defense created the Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office to address the issues raised in the report. In August 1993, the office published an 82-page report on Korean War POWs, concluding that some had been transferred to the Soviet Union “and never repatriated.”

In 1992, the U.S. and Russia formed a joint commission to investigate unresolved POW cases. When Russian President Boris Yeltsin addressed Congress that June, he promised “no more lies, ever.”

American and Russian researchers delved into newly opened Russian archives, conducting more than 1,000 interviews with Soviet veterans.

One of those earliest interviews turned up a possible lead on Capt. Moore.

In 1993, Estonian witness Boris Uibo “claimed to have met an American named Gary or Harry in Camp No. 18, near Potma, Mordovia, sometime in 1952. Uibo is convinced that the inmate was shot down in the Korean War.” The two men made wooden chess pieces together.

In 1997, U.S. representatives interviewed Igor Ivanovich Shashva in Taganrog, Russia. The Russian pilot said he’d been told an American pilot named Capt. Gary or Harry Moore, shot down in the summer of 1951, had been interrogated by the Soviets.

Also in 1997, U.S. representatives interviewed Aleksey Alekseevich Kalyuzhniy in Odessa, Ukraine. He said he shot down an F-51 on June 1, 1951, and watched the plane land on water near shore.

He said the pilot should have survived.

The Department of Defense and the Air Force Missing Persons Branch notified Bob and Lois Moore of the developments on Aug. 7, 2002, five years after the interviews.

Since then, the government has provided the Moores no new information.

Lois is convinced the answer to Harry’s fate remains in the Russian archives, but fears the effort has fallen victim to a lack of political will.

For more than a decade, the U.S. had researchers boring into the Russian archives. In its last formal update, in 2005, the U.S.-Russia Joint Commission on POWs/MIA published a 100_page “Gulag Study,” detailing hundreds of case studies and sightings of Americans in the Soviet prison system.

“(M)ost reports we have received lack the specificity needed to correlate them to individuals still listed as missing,” the report said.

When relations cooled between the two countries in 2006, much of the archive research halted. About two years ago, however, the U.S. and Russia reconstituted the joint commission.

In 2012, the DPMO sent a letter to the Moores saying it was continuing its Korean War work at the Russian archives, with two researchers conducting eight days of research per month. In early 2013, the DPMO reported that more than 7,900 Americans remain unaccounted for from Korea.

Since 2002, the Moores have attended dozens of DPMO and other briefings around the country. They’ve delved into National Archive records and worked with other researchers. On several occasions, they offered to hire their own investigator to look at the Russian archives. The DPMO told them the archives are not open to the general public.

In January, the Moores traveled to Washington, D.C., to meet one of the analysts who interviewed the two Russian pilots who provided the possible information about Harry.

Bob pushed the analyst to confirm what the family suspected – that Harry survived and ended up under Russian control, which the analyst did. “His remark was, ‘This is the smoking gun we were looking for,’ “ Bob said.

When Bob and Lois moved to Eagle in 2009, they rented out their vineyard home in Star to Hope Manna and Kellie Allred, two Hollywood filmmakers moving to Idaho.

They became close friends. In 2011, after Bob and Lois had returned from a particularly discouraging DPMO meeting, Bob asked the filmmakers whether they’d be interested in making a documentary about Harry’s story.

They were touched, and Harry’s story is now memorialized in the film “Keeping the Promise Alive.”

“I think it is a miracle we found them,” Bob said. “We have honored Harry and we have opened the door to (getting more information). We have honored the others that are missing.”

Bob, 87, and Lois, 85, said they know time is running short for them. They know that Capt. Moore, who would be 89, is probably not alive. But their daughters and their granddaughter have vowed to continue trying to find out what happened.

“We have done the best that we can for Harry,” Lois said.

The Associated Press

The Associated Press

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Daily Republic does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

.

Solano News

Bay Area makes growth plans

By Barry Eberling | From Page: A1, 1 Comment

 
Supervisor candidates vary on Plan Bay Area

By Barry Eberling | From Page: A1, 14 Comments | Gallery

Earth Day means cleanup Day for Suisun City

By Susan Hiland | From Page: A1, 5 Comments | Gallery

 
Hop to it: Couple lights up home, yard for Easter

By Amy Maginnis-Honey | From Page: C1

Ranking the best Bay Area athletes

By Brad Stanhope | From Page: A2

 
The Edge hosts Easter egg hunt

By Adrienne Harris | From Page: A3

Alooma Temple keeps children in mind

By Adrienne Harris | From Page: A3 | Gallery

 
Fairfield author to speak at women’s expo

By Susan Hiland | From Page: A3

Piano scholarship competition set in Vallejo

By Susan Hiland | From Page: A3

 
The resurrection has changed the lives of Christians

By Perry W. Polk | From Page: C3

 
Armijo graduate completes basic training

By Nick DeCicco | From Page: C4

 
Understanding your health insurance

By Morgan Westfall | From Page: D4, 1 Comment

 
Record Store Day a commercial hit

By Adrienne Harris | From Page: A5 | Gallery

Easter egg hunt brings out the smiles

By Susan Hiland | From Page: A5, 2 Comments | Gallery

 
Dutch Bros. joins Fairfield coffee corridor

By Barry Eberling | From Page: B7, 6 Comments | Gallery

City sets plan to dispose of property assets

By Brian Miller and Karl Dumas | From Page: B7, 1 Comment

 
Fairfield police log: April 17, 2014

By Susan Hiland | From Page: A12

Suisun City police log: April 17, 2014

By Susan Hiland | From Page: A12

 
.

US / World

Counties tell Brown they need money for his law

By The Associated Press | From Page: A1, 1 Comment

 
San Francisco probe leading to entrapment claims

By The Associated Press | From Page: A6

Exhibit recreates Warhol’s 1964 World’s Fair mural

By The Associated Press | From Page: A10

 
NASA’s space station Robonaut finally getting legs

By The Associated Press | From Page: A10 | Gallery

Ohio couple married 70 years die 15 hours apart

By The Associated Press | From Page: A11 | Gallery

 
Documents detail another delayed GM recall

By The Associated Press | From Page: A11, 1 Comment

At barricades, Ukraine insurgents await Easter

By The Associated Press | From Page: A13

 
Official: 3 bodies retrieved from inside ferry

By The Associated Press | From Page: A13 | Gallery

13th body pulled from snow in Everest avalanche

By The Associated Press | From Page: A13

 
Costa Rican a celebrity after certified miracle

By The Associated Press | From Page: A14 | Gallery

.

Opinion

Government … for the government?

By Bill James | From Page: A8, 9 Comments

 
Editorial Cartoons for April 20, 2014

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: A8

Question of the week: Will Flight 370 be found?

By Daily Republic | From Page: A8

 
Neighborhood speeders don’t get it

By Letter to the Editor | From Page: A8, 7 Comments

 
Why would a person do this?

By Letter to the Editor | From Page: A8, 3 Comments

Sound off for April 20, 2014

By Daily Republic | From Page: A8, 1 Comment

 
Jeb Bush, love, and today’s GOP

By Ruben Navarrette | From Page: A9, 1 Comment

 
 
.

Living

Today in History for April 20, 2014

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

 
Community Calendar: April 20, 2014

By Susan Hiland | From Page: A2

Bill Nye says he underestimated debate’s impact

By The Associated Press | From Page: C3, 10 Comments

 
Book details lives of cloistered nuns

By The Associated Press | From Page: C3

Horoscopes for April 20, 2014

By Holiday Mathis | From Page: D4

 
Pete spends weekends at my house but he never invites me to his

By Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar | From Page: D4

.

Entertainment

Flea of Red Hot Chili Peppers has book deal

By The Associated Press | From Page: C2

 
Tartt, Goodwin finalists for Carnegie medals

By The Associated Press | From Page: C2

New book on fracking illuminates pros, cons

By The Associated Press | From Page: C2

 
PUBLISHERS WEEKLY BEST-SELLERS

By The Associated Press | From Page: C2

TVGrid

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B11

 
.

Sports

A’s score 3 in 9th, rally past Astros 4-3

By The Associated Press | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
Warriors beat Clippers 109-105 in playoff opener

By The Associated Press | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
Kings, Sharks look to put Game 1 in past

By The Associated Press | From Page: B1 | Gallery

Stults, Padres hand Giants third straight loss

By The Associated Press | From Page: B1

 
Hawks take 1-0 lead by rolling past Pacers 101-93

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

Calathes suspension a reminder of supplement risk

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

 
Raptors GM Ujiri uses profanity about Brooklyn

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

Williams scores 24 as Nets beat Raptors 94-87

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2 | Gallery

 
Durant leads Thunder past Grizzlies 100-86

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

Federer beats injured Djokovic to reach final

By The Associated Press | From Page: B3 | Gallery

 
Indians set two new school records for track

By Daily Republic staff | From Page: B4

Wie shoots 67, wins LPGA LOTTE Championship

By The Associated Press | From Page: B4

 
Rapids, Earthquakes play to scoreless tie

By The Associated Press | From Page: B4

Travis Bowl Highlights

By Daily Republic | From Page: B4

 
Jimenez leads Langer by 1 shot in Greater Gwinnett

By The Associated Press | From Page: B4

Stars Recreation bowling results

By Daily Republic | From Page: B4

 
Donald shoots 66, takes lead at RBC Heritage

By The Associated Press | From Page: B4

Big names among prospective Buffalo Bills buyers

By The Associated Press | From Page: B4

 
Award-winning archery champ shoots with his teeth

By The Associated Press | From Page: B6 | Gallery

Survivors keep busy as Boston Marathon approaches

By The Associated Press | From Page: B6

 
.

Business

Why high oil prices are actually good for airlines

By The Associated Press | From Page: B7

 
US delays review of contentious Keystone pipeline

By The Associated Press | From Page: B7

Subscription sample boxes shake up beauty routines

By The Associated Press | From Page: B8

 
Girls from modest families get lift in technology

By The Associated Press | From Page: B12

Haunted house part of San Antonio apartment lofts

By The Associated Press | From Page: B13

 
Recalls this week: lanterns, exercise devices

By The Associated Press | From Page: B13

Review: Siri-like Cortana fills Windows phone gap

By The Associated Press | From Page: B14

 
.

Obituaries

Sealwyn Shirley Brucefield Shepherd Malkiewicz

By Nancy Green | From Page: A4

 
Margaret Elizabeth Silva

By Susan Hiland | From Page: A4

Lloyd G. Hoffmeister

By Nancy Green | From Page: A4

 
Ramon Isidro

By Adrienne Harris | From Page: A4

Rogelio Tinoco-Zamudio

By Susan Hiland | From Page: A4

 
James Leroy Barbour

By Nancy Green | From Page: A4

William Paul Wehrly

By Nancy Green | From Page: A4

 
.

Comics