Thursday, October 2, 2014
FAIRFIELD-SUISUN, CALIFORNIA
99 CENTS

Oh, for the days of Dr. Welby

thomasson column sig

By
From page A13 | April 16, 2014 |

When our longtime family doctor retired in the early 1960s, he was, according to my mother, charging the same amount for an office visit as he did in the 1930s when she and my father first became his patients. I always thought that was a bit of an exaggeration and it probably was but not much of one. The routine visit still hadn’t reached $10.

The health care cost comparisons of yesterday and today were brought home sharply by the discovery of the obstetric bills for the birth of my first two children two years apart in 1961 and 1963. The charges for pre and postnatal care were a whopping $160 for my son and $150 for my daughter. The $10 difference for the boy was for a surgical procedure. Combined with a three-day stay in the hospital for their mother, the total for each was $300. Wow, that much!

A friend told me that as a 16-year-old, he would drive his doctor father on his house calls, many in poorer neighborhoods in their New England city. Before they would start out, the father would stop at a local store and load up the car with groceries that met the dietary requirements of his patients who couldn’t afford them. Rural patients, my friend said, often paid in produce and eggs and so forth. His father developed a heart problem from the stress of his practice and died in his 40s, leaving my friend and his mother with hardly enough to bury him.

These examples of course came before the government got into the health care business in 1965 and most Americans went to one doctor for nearly everything, even minor surgery. A distinguished surgeon at Tulane University reminded me of this recently, noting that the “general practitioners” when we grew up were not just referral services so many are today.

The newly released figures on the horrendous amounts being paid by Medicare to some doctors brought new perspective to what has happened to the cost of medicine and to the image of the benevolent doctor of my parent’s generation. Amazingly an eye doctor was paid $21 million in one year. How could he handle that many patients? Ophthalmology, it seems, is the most lucrative specialty apparently because of the high cost of treating macular degeneration or cancer, especially among the aged.

Some 3,000 ophthalmologist received $3.3 billion of the $77 billion paid out to doctors in 2012, according to an analysis by the New York Times. Well, pretty soon, as the late Sen. Everett Dirksen said, “we’re going to be talking about real money.”

In fairness, a whole lot of the 880,000 doctors and medical service providers who accept Medicare didn’t do quite so well – not bad mind you, just not quite up to the 2 percent who made almost one quarter of the total amount. One hundred doctors alone in 2012 took in a nifty $610 million, according to the Times. These figures are so startling as to leave one as breathless as a person on the verge of a heart attack. It is easy to see why Medicare has been reluctant to release them and the American Medical Association has opposed their disclosure.

A study in several western states of physician’s payments under Medicaid, the state and federal shared plan for the indigents, showed that doctors who had been making no more than $15,000 annually were paid as high as $300,000 in the first year after 1965 when the program was adopted along with Medicare. Several doctors complained that their income was private. My response was obviously that the portion of money paid out of taxpayer funds was the public’s business. I feel the same way about Medicare.

What all this says about where we are headed in the not too distant future as we approach universal health care to 350 million Americans and still having enough money left over for running the government is scary. I just saw a hospital/physicians bill for an emergency abdominal surgery and 10 day stay that was $182,500. I had never seen a bill that high.

How far we have come since the passage of Medicare when the estimates projected the ultimate cost of this entitlement would be $30 billion annually. Try 20 times that and still climbing.

Dan Thomasson is an op-ed columnist for McClatchy-Tribune and a former vice president of Scripps Howard Newspapers. Readers may send him email at: thomassondan@aol.com.

Dan K. Thomasson

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | 13 comments

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  • The MisterApril 15, 2014 - 7:26 am

    Government doesn't do ANYTHING without screwing it up.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • rlw895April 15, 2014 - 8:18 pm

    Didn't Rush Limbaugh make that claim? Then he made the mistake of having Mario Cuomo on to debate it. Those radio talk show entertainers sound pretty good as long as they don't leave their echo chamber.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • ?April 15, 2014 - 9:06 pm

    So rlw how did you avoid the draft? Where you of war age during Vietnam?

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Danny BuntinApril 15, 2014 - 10:44 pm

    He just hung out with Dick C. and George B., they showed him how it was done.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • rlw895April 16, 2014 - 1:10 am

    ? You're weird.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • P.J.April 15, 2014 - 8:15 am

    The Mister.....YOU are so very correct. Not only is it almost impossible to believe the cost of seeing a doctor, I can hardly believe what is being paid to insure people. While I have Medicare, I was amazed yesterday that a 30 year old couple is paying $600.00 for health insurance and still ended up with a $1500.00 co-pay for a same-day visit. No wonder these kids can't afford rent!

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Danny BuntinApril 16, 2014 - 9:24 am

    Would a "same day visit" be code for "Emergency room"? Never let the facts get in the way of a good yarn.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Dr. Marcus Welby & and Losing Weight ( sad but true I am guilty too )April 15, 2014 - 8:26 am

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SJBg6EYrXGs

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • SixStrRzrApril 15, 2014 - 10:52 am

    At the risk of hyperbole and histrionics, medical costs seem to be the world's way of cleansing older folks from the population. No one can afford to retire, as post-retirement Medicare (or other countries' equivalent) doesn't cover enough, requiring retirees to have expensive secondary supplemental coverage. So, they remain in the work force until they drop, as the corporate world is overworking (and under paying) just about everyone. Again, just my knee-jerk view based on what Media is regurgitating these days.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Typical Fairfield residentApril 15, 2014 - 1:41 pm

    Medical costs and funeral expenses are the last chance that corporations have of bleeding you dry before you die. My son spent about 12 hours at Northbay being "observed" in ICU, got one x-ray, and a liter of fluid for a mere $200,000. That's where the money goes, for nothing. By the way, Medicare is insurance that you spend your whole life paying for, not an "entitlement."

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • mescApril 15, 2014 - 8:15 pm

    Wrong. My neighbor never worked a day in her life and she gets Medicare and MediCal. She also gets a check from SS. Yes, no work but all the perks of a retirement courtesy the American Taxpayer. While I do not mind helping, Career Welfare is not help. It hurts everyone.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • rlw895April 16, 2014 - 12:55 am

    This was a pretty good column until Thomasson blamed the increase in medical cost on the government. That does nothing but obscure the more significant cause: Human greed. It's lack of government, not government that has let health care cost escalate out of control.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • PornacApril 16, 2014 - 7:06 am

    I wonder how much my recent MRI would cost in 1961?

    Reply | Report abusive comment
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