FAIRFIELD-SUISUN, CALIFORNIA
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Letters to editor

District needs peanut-free schools

By From page A8 | July 28, 2014

I’m saddened that Fairfield-Suisun School District appears to put economic concerns ahead of those for students’ lives. A July 11 Daily Republic article (District to Eye Peanut-Free Classrooms) stated that trustees said a districtwide policy prohibiting peanut products couldn’t be enforced. Also, Fairfield schools served 183,000 peanut butter and jelly sandwiches this year.

As the grandparent of two children with the most severe form of peanut allergy, I empathize with Mr. Bud Nobili, who expressed concerns to the school board about the safety of his 4-year-old grandson when he begins kindergarten in the district. The principal’s recommendation was to have my grandson sit alone in a separate table in the cafeteria. His parents assured the principal that it was not an acceptable solution.

The school nurse provided a letter for the parents of my grandson’s classmates to alert them to his life-threatening condition. The letter asked that children not bring peanut products for lunch or snacks. Parents and classmates were very cooperative. Occasionally a parent and the teacher forgot the request.

At school the Epi-pen is locked away in the principal’s office. The school nurse rotates among schools. Which school staff would train to administer the shot? Precious minutes and life could be lost if a child suffers anaphylactic shock.

How does the school board know that a districtwide peanut-free policy cannot be enforced? Did district staff research the issue? What if a school board member’s child or grandchild were affected by a life-threatening food allergy? Children have died from exposure. I believe the real issue is that 183,000 peanut butter and jelly sandwiches were served in schools. How much money would the school district save as opposed to switching to another food?

Relying on a site-by-site approach is not a viable option. Children’s lives will continue to be at risk without a districtwide policy prohibiting peanut products.

Sherron Robertson

Fairfield

Letter to the Editor

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Discussion | 7 comments

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  • DRIPJuly 25, 2014 - 7:45 pm

    Nuts!

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  • 2realJuly 28, 2014 - 5:59 am

    I think we should start with a drug/gang/weapon free school.

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  • just a thoughtJuly 28, 2014 - 7:10 am

    Seems to me that I have read countless studies that have shown that peanut and gluten allergies are not really a serious issue. They are usually the result of parents wanting their children to be special. Don't be mad at me folks that's not my opinion. And your entitled to yours. But science has proven when it comes to these allergies some of us are just......well.....nuts?

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  • MarkJuly 28, 2014 - 4:47 pm

    Do you have a source for your, "opinion?" I am sure you can find one of the "countless" studies you read.

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  • just a thoughtJuly 29, 2014 - 8:03 am

    One quick reference would be a Jan 2009 article in Time in which Harvard professor Dr. Nicholas Christakis shares his "opinion". But there are many others as well. LA Times, Huff Post, NY Times, and on and on.

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  • Let's be Real HereJuly 28, 2014 - 8:54 am

    Even if the school district did not provide nuts that would not prevent some kid bringing in a cookie from home..... peanut M&M's etc. You have to be realistic here. Some kids are diabetic, some kids have allergies, but lunches can't be fitted for this small percent of kids.

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  • One against many.....July 28, 2014 - 9:08 am

    And now we have another person wanting to control the behavior of many. I'm sorry the little one has an allergy, and I would be willing to modify some things voluntarily, however, to ban all these foods that the majority of people eat and bring to school is too far out there. It's like the people that got winter fires banned--the smoke irritates me, so no one can do it. We'll report smoke so the smoke police can ticket you. On a side note however, a school district did drop the federal food subsidy, and found they will actually make $7 million over the course of the year, instead of a $13 million loss.

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