FAIRFIELD-SUISUN, CALIFORNIA
spca_clinic_12_28_12

SPCA president Dave Roth, right, gestures while speaking to other SPCA board members inside what will be the shelter's new low-cost spay and neuter clinic Friday in Vacaville. (Robinson Kuntz/Daily Republic)

Solano County

SPCA building low-cost spay, neuter clinic

By From page A3 | December 29, 2012

VACAVILLE — The SPCA of Solano County is hoping to fill a gaping need in the area by building the only full-time, low-cost spay-and-neuter clinic.

The portable building is being converted and staff is preparing to open the clinic in about 120 days, said SPCA President Dave Roth.

With the nearest low-cost clinic in Napa or Sacramento, Roth said it’s long overdue that Solano County had its own. Solano County Animal Control occasionally offers discounted clinics, but nothing permanent exists, Roth said.

“We are spending reserves on this, but the need is there. It has to be done,” Roth said while showing off the progress. “If we just handle the need in Solano County, we will be slammed.”

The trailer is framed, showing the beginnings of what will house the three operating tables, recovery rooms and reception area. At 40-by-27 feet, the clinic will be much larger than most. The $100,000 price tag is made possible by several donations, on which SPCA relies heavily and will continue to solicit until it’s completed.

“This community is pretty receptive to things that make sense,” Roth said. “Once you get it going, you can sustain it. That’s the important part.”

Director Debbie Dillon said the shelter receives 10 to 15 calls a day asking for a low-cost clinic. The current options are sending them to local veterinarians or the Napa facility.

The plan is to operate 250 days a year, spaying or neutering 20 animals a day. Dillon said that may not even cover the need for Solano County.

Roth said the clinic is the latest in additions to the SPCA compound, which sits on Peabody Road near California State Prison, Solano. After adding a training classroom and a fully stocked store in the past couple of years, the board and staff continue to push for improvements.

“We want it to be a destination. If they come here one thing, they can do another,” Roth said. “If you have things here for people to spend money on, they’ll happily do it here.”

Reach Danny Bernardini at 427-6935 or [email protected] Follow him on Twitter at www.twitter.com/dbernardinidr.

Danny Bernardini

Danny Bernardini

Danny is a newspaper man born and raised in Vacaville. He attended Chico State University and has written for the Enterprise Record and the Reporter. Covers the City of Fairfield, education and crime. A's, Warriors and Saints fan. Listener of vinyl, frequent visitor to the East Bay. Registered "decline to state" voter. Loves a good steak.
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  • BrianDecember 29, 2012 - 9:09 am

    Its about time. We need to make it as easy as possible for owners to get their pets spayed and neutered.

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  • JessicaJanuary 09, 2013 - 11:21 am

    I think this is a great plan. It's solving the problem of having too many unwanted animals. Cats in particular because there are a lot more stray cats than dogs. Tackle the problem at the source or else this cycle will continue! It's unfortunate that there are so many feral cats. It saddens me to see kittens wandering around and knowing there's nothing I can really do to solve the problem.

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