Friday, November 28, 2014
FAIRFIELD-SUISUN, CALIFORNIA
99 CENTS

Solano County supervisors get raise

By
From page A2 | August 27, 2014 |

FAIRFIELD — Solano County supervisors have received a 1.83 percent raise, boosting their annual base salaries to $97,843.

The Board of Supervisors in 1997 tied the base salary for its members to a percentage of the salary of a Superior Court judge, with the amount set at 53 percent. California recently raised the salary for judges.

“It was a modest adjustment, less than our employees,” County Administrator Birgitta Corsello said Tuesday.

Most county employees will receive a 2 percent raise in October for the second consecutive year under union contracts.

The state made the salary increase for judges retroactive to July 1. Solano County made the salary increase for the Board of Supervisors take effect July 20, after the county received notification of the judge salary increase.

“We don’t do retroactive,” Corsello said.

Supervisors also receive a $10,400 annual auto allowance and are eligible for longevity pay tied to their years of public service that can amount to several thousand dollars annually for long-time supervisors.

The Board of Supervisors salary during the Great Recession remained at $94,758. Supervisors received their first pay raise in six years in late December 2013, a 1.4 percent increase that made their base annual salary $96,085.

Solano County doesn’t typically make a public announcement of increases to the Board of Supervisors salary and it didn’t do so this year.

Various other California counties also tie board of supervisors salaries to some percentage of the Superior Court judge salary, including neighboring Napa County. But Napa County supervisors vote to make changes to the county salary table and index reflecting the raises at a public meeting.

The Napa Board of Supervisors did so most recently at its Aug. 19 meeting. It changed its salary table to reflect the 1.83 percent salary increase as part of its consent calendar, without discussion. Napa County has about one-third the population of Solano County. Its supervisors earn about $86,900 annually.

The Solano County Board of Supervisors in 1997 set its pay at 46 percent of a Superior Court judge salary, ending the practice of voting for the increases itself. The board in 2001 raised this to 53 percent of a judge’s salary and got rid of an auto allowance of several thousand dollars annually. During a 2007 budget session, the board added back the auto allowance, this time at $10,400 annually.

Reach Barry Eberling at 427-6929 or beberling@dailyrepublic.net. Follow him on Twitter at www.twitter.com/beberlingdr.

Barry Eberling

Barry Eberling

Barry Eberling has been a reporter with the Daily Republic since 1987. He covers Solano County government, transportation, growth and the environment. He received his bachelors of art degree from the University of California, Santa Barbara and his masters degree in journalism from the University of California, Berkeley.
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Discussion | 13 comments

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  • trish hamiltonAugust 27, 2014 - 4:59 am

    Sooo Spering didn't make enough on the sale of his train station land and now he needs more money?? When does this thievery by the Board of Supes stop? Why can't there be a ceiling for pay-- do they deserve to be paid that much??HELL NO!!

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • SteveAugust 27, 2014 - 8:27 am

    Jim Spering has not sold any land near the train station. Where are you getting your information? Pam Bertani?

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • SteveAugust 27, 2014 - 8:37 am

    The Board of Supervisors manages an annual budget of $826 million, that serves a population of 400,000 people. It makes decisions that effects things like 1900 miles of paved roads and $291 million in agricultural production. Our county is in the top half of the state in terms of population and contains $39 BILLION in assets. Their decisions affect us each and every day. What do you think that's worth?

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Typical County WorkerAugust 27, 2014 - 10:02 am

    Well, since Solano County is still suffering from the Great Repression, and other county workers were furloughed, they don't need a pay raise. They aren't going to starve and have to go on public assistance.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Typical County WorkerAugust 27, 2014 - 10:06 am

    Can't call it a Great Depression and they are calling it the Great Recession. So to be fair for those that much sacrifice for the greater economy we should call it the Great Repression.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • SteveAugust 27, 2014 - 10:51 am

    The Recession is finally almost over. Most County employee contracts have a 2% raise this year. Should those raises be retracted? Should county workers never get a salary increase again? Should no one ever get a salary increase again? How do you grow an economy if no one ever gets ahead? That's how economies are supposed to work. That's how they grow. You make more than it costs to live and you spend some of that extra money on goods and services.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Time For TruthAugust 27, 2014 - 11:47 am

    Steve said, "How do you grow an economy if no one ever gets ahead? That's how economies are supposed to work." Really Steve? Take hundreds of thousands of dollars from county residents and give it to 5 elite people... that's what makes an economy work? In what country, Steve; North Korea? Cuba?

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • SteveAugust 27, 2014 - 9:00 pm

    Yes that is exactly how you grow an economy. In this country. You pay people for their work. The Board is a job. What they make is trivial compared to what they affect. The raise is .000001% of the budget. And Cuba doesn't have an economy.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Steven KaysAugust 27, 2014 - 5:29 am

    Like it or not, studies show that higher salaries for top decision makers actually can save costs overall. Salaries are higher in the private sector for top level managers. Heard that Singapore pays their top people perhaps about $2,000,000 a year. Just a thought.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Time For TruthAugust 27, 2014 - 7:03 am

    Like it or not? Steven, what's the reasoning behind those studies? Don't just throw it out there like it's a fact. We're not that stoopid.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • GroupadminAugust 27, 2014 - 1:49 pm

    First of all, this should be put to a public vote, PERIOD. with all the cut backs everyone in the county is doing, the supervisors don't need nor deserve to give themselves a raise. And the only reason why Pam Bertani is running and trying to leave the Fairfield Council is because the supervisors get paid. she has no job and she wants a job that pays money. how else will she be able to get more people to hang around her and do her make up and act like she is queen bee around the area. People you need to really think about how you vote this November. we need new blood in the area, but not blood suckers like Pam Bertani. Someone tell me, what council member in the history of Fairfield ever had to have 3 SUV's and a staff of people to follow around them and take photo ops and have their hair done? What councilmember has ever told the school that their kids go to that their kids are not to be messed with or the school will have more then they need to deal with? people do your research and you Pam Bertani, get off your high soap box and get down to reality.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • RBAugust 27, 2014 - 8:50 pm

    Please give more detail on 3 SUV enterouge? Is this real or blown smoke?

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Samuel AdamsAugust 27, 2014 - 9:54 pm

    When was the last Jim Spering actually had to work for a living?

    Reply | Report abusive comment
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