Sunday, March 29, 2015
FAIRFIELD-SUISUN, CALIFORNIA
99 CENTS

March weather proved hard to predict

bates column sig

By
From page A2 | April 03, 2014 |

According to historians, the Romans named the month of March after Mars, the god of war, as it was a traditional time to resume military campaigns. They made March the first month of their year.

If you look at it, not much has changed.

The media has been buzzing with speculations about what Russian President Vladimir Putin is going to do in Ukraine. It seems that men learn little from the lessons of history. I ask, do we even seldom hear about women saber-rattling and mounting full-blown scrimmages and wars around the world? I think not.

The early settlers of our country dreaded March as a time of deprivation and many of them died from lack of food and didn’t make it to spring.

“Our life is March weather, savage and serene in one hour,” American poet and essayist Ralph Waldo Emerson once wrote. Even today, many weather forecasters, I’m sure, would agree with that assessment.

On the other hand, maybe we should try looking on the bright side, as March is also known as the month of firsts. We see the first daffodil, the first robin, and in March the swallows traditionally return to San Juan Capistrano.

“The first day of spring is one thing, and the first spring day is another. The difference between them is sometimes as great as a month,” American author, educator and clergyman Henry Van Dyke once said.

We know that March can be very temperamental weather-wise and can range from blizzards in some parts of the country to mudslides like those 55 miles northeast of Seattle, reported to be one of the deadliest in U.S. history.

According to an old proverb, if March comes in like a lion, it will go out like a lamb. That simply didn’t happen this year as there are unpredictable, fast-moving weather systems, depending on the part of the country where you live. Just last week, a tornado touched down in Roseville.

Speaking of weather in different parts of the country, we own a home in Tennessee approximately 72 miles from Nashville. The house, renovated a few years ago, remains unoccupied. We recently received a $900 water bill but the person who looks after the house couldn’t find any signs of water damage. The water department refused to do anything until a certified plumber made an assessment. But the plumber couldn’t do anything until the frozen ground unthawed and this took a couple of weeks.

In the meantime, we received a second water bill for more than $400, though the water department said they had turned off the water. Finally the plumber was able to locate the problem and reported his findings to the water department. We did not pay the entire water bill – but still much more than we expected. Then on top of that, the plumber’s bill that included labor, new pipes, lumber, paint and other incidentals ran into thousands of dollars.

Actually, unpredictable weather in March isn’t anything new. Consider the blizzard in March 1888 that struck the northeast and 400 lives were lost. Then in March 1987, a blizzard struck parts of Nebraska. Wind gusts created 12-foot snowdrifts.

I lived in Nebraska for several years and almost had heart failure every time my car tires would slide over glass like streets of ice on my way to work at North High School in Omaha. So when husband Jim, after retirement at Travis Air Force Base, decided that California was a good place to settle down, remembering those Nebraska and Massachusetts winters, I didn’t put up much of an argument.

Since I’ve given you quite a bit of depressing weather news, it seems only fair that I should leave you with a quote from naturalist Hal Borland who wrote, “April is a promise that May is bound to keep.” With that thought in mind, why not go out and plant a tree, plant some flowers, fly a kite, build a tree or bird house, or even learn to throw a curve ball.

After all, it’s April now!

Mayrene Bates is a trustee on the Solano County Board of Education.

Mayrene Bates

Mayrene Bates is a trustee with the Solano County Board of Education.
LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | 1 comment

The Daily Republic does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

  • CD BrooksApril 03, 2014 - 8:39 am

    Weather forecast: Most of the time it gets hot or cold and sometimes it rains and snows. Sometimes there are “surprises!” Talk to those folks in Atlanta during that "mystery" storm, never saw or heard such angst directed at the weather folks!

    Reply | Report abusive comment
.

Solano News

Vanden High library project nears completion

By Bill Hicks | From Page: A1 | Gallery

 
Vanden girls end stellar season

By Brian Arnold | From Page: C1 | Gallery

Cheers for Jupiter – and roller derby

By Brad Stanhope | From Page: A2, 2 Comments

 
Vacaville police make arrest after pursuit

By Bill Hicks | From Page: A3, 3 Comments | Gallery

Red Cross volunteers help assemble first aid kits

By Bill Hicks | From Page: A3 | Gallery

 
PG&E helps replace stolen equipment

By Bill Hicks | From Page: A3

Justin-Siena names new principal

By Bill Hicks | From Page: A3

 
Free paper shredding option returns to Fairfield

By Susan Hiland | From Page: A5 | Gallery

 
Vacaville bridal, quinceanera show a hit

By Susan Hiland | From Page: A5

Event benefits child who attends Cambridge School

By Susan Hiland | From Page: A5 | Gallery

 
Best barometer of investment success: Wealth

By Mark Sievers | From Page: B8

 
Tips on hydrozoning your garden

By Tina Saravia | From Page: B8, 2 Comments

 
Fairfield police log: March 27, 2015

By Susan Hiland | From Page: A12

 
Suisun City police log: March 27, 2015

By Susan Hiland | From Page: A12

.

US / World

Gang chief, international fugitive among dozens paroled

By The Associated Press | From Page: A1

 
Experts: Sex bias case will embolden women despite verdict

By The Associated Press | From Page: A1

Crash victim’s father calls for more focus on pilot welfare

By The Associated Press | From Page: A1

 
Popular Yosemite National Park lookout opens early in season

By The Associated Press | From Page: A9

 
Bird flu found in a top Minnesota turkey producing county

By The Associated Press | From Page: A11

 
Some British Airways frequent flier accounts miles breached

By The Associated Press | From Page: A11

7 shot and injured at Florida spring break house party

By The Associated Press | From Page: A11

 
Boko Haram kills 39, legislator, disrupting Nigeria election

By The Associated Press | From Page: A11

Official: Al-Shabab siege at Somali hotel ends, 24 dead

By The Associated Press | From Page: A11

 
Islamic fighters led by al-Qaida in Syria seize major city

By The Associated Press | From Page: A13

 
.

Living

Today in History: March 29, 2015

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2

 
Community Calendar: March 29, 2015

By Susan Hiland | From Page: A2

Pope finds popularity and dissent at 2-year mark

By The Associated Press | From Page: C3

 
Truth does not change

By The Rev. Art Zacher | From Page: C3, 1 Comment

Horoscopes: March 29, 2015

By Holiday Mathis | From Page: B8

 
Daughter choses stepdad over father to walk her down the aisle

By Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar | From Page: B8

.

Entertainment

PUBLISHERS WEEKLY BEST-SELLERS

By The Associated Press | From Page: A10

 
Second Julie Andrews memoir expected in 2017

By The Associated Press | From Page: A10

Chrissie Hynde memoir coming in September

By The Associated Press | From Page: A10

 
TVGrid

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B12

.

Sports

 
Warriors beat Bucks 108-95, clinch top seed in West

By The Associated Press | From Page: B1

Wisconsin heads to Final Four after 85-78 win over Arizona

By The Associated Press | From Page: B1

 
Burns scores winner in SO to lift Sharks past Flyers, 3-2

By The Associated Press | From Page: B1

 
Power leads Penske sweep in qualifying for IndyCar opener

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

Revolution win first of season, beating Earthquakes 2-1

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

 
Jenest pitches SCC baseball team to shutout of Contra Costa

By Daily Republic staff | From Page: B2

AP sources: Texas fires coach Barnes after 17 years

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

 
Kazmir, Quintana both strong; A’s beat White Sox 10-4

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

Zunino homers twice, but Giants rally to edge Mariners 9-8

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

 
Gordon, Earnhardt among the winners and fans of Martinsville

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

Prince Bishop wins Dubai World Cup, California Chrome 2nd

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

 
Serena Williams easily wins opening match at Miami Open

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

Jimmy Walker leads hometown Texas Open

By The Associated Press | From Page: B3

 
.

Business

A glance at women in leadership roles in business worldwide

By The Associated Press | From Page: B8

 
For business, more women in charge means bigger profits

By The Associated Press | From Page: B8 | Gallery

US drillers scrambling to thwart OPEC threat

By The Associated Press | From Page: B8 | Gallery

 
Test trial to use computer servers to heat homes

By The Associated Press | From Page: B14

.

Obituaries

Robert Roberts

By Nancy Green | From Page: A4

 
Janice Jewel Thompson

By Nancy Green | From Page: A4

Betty Mason

By Nancy Green | From Page: A4

 
Tiffany Lyn (Helzer) Kemp

By Nancy Green | From Page: A4

Richard F. Coleman

By Nancy Green | From Page: A4

 
James Lee Lewis

By Nancy Green | From Page: A4

Helen Kalis

By Nancy Green | From Page: A4

 
Carol A. Vose

By Nancy Green | From Page: A4

.

Comics