FAIRFIELD-SUISUN, CALIFORNIA
the Fairfield Coin Show

Rare coins line a dealer case at the Fairfield Coin Show at the Fairfield Community Center, Aug. 10, 2014, in Fairfield. (Steve Reczkowski/Daliy Republic)

Fairfield

Fairfield hosts coin show

By From page A3 | August 11, 2014

FAIRFIELD — Vacaville resident Colin Fisher came to Fairfield on Sunday seeking some bullion and easily found some.

He went to the Fairfield Coin Club’s 25th Annual Coin and Collectibles Show at the Fairfield Community Center. Thirty-five dealers sat behind tables, with desk lamps casting extra light on glass display cases and plastic coin holders.

Some collectors seek numismatic coins, those rare coins from yesteryear that derive much of their value from a mix of scarcity and demand. Others seek bullion coins that derive their value from their precious metal, be it silver or gold or platinum.

“I used to collect coins,” Fisher said. “Here’s the problem with coins – the value is very personal to different people. With bullion, the price is set everyday. You know basically what it is worth, though there is a slight premium on some of them.”

He held up three gleaming silver coins, two of them one ounce and the other a half-ounce.

Be it bullion or numismatic coins, the Fairfield show had them. It had New Zealand coins and the American Silver Eagle Dollar series first minted in 1986 and mercury dimes and Buffalo nickels and Shield nickels and paper money.

The murmur of conversation filled the Community Center assembly hall as the deals went down. Some of the coin dealers also bought coins.

Bob Belleau Sr., of Vallejo, is president of the Fairfield Coin Club and has been a member for 20 years. Among his pursuits has been collecting silver quarters that got issued from 1932 to 1964. He found much of this collection in his change.

“I had to buy probably 15 of the quarters from the dealers in the shows,” Belleau said.

Now he’s trying to get a penny collection going for his two-year-old granddaughter.

“A penny collection for kids is one of those things – you save them pennies, start them a book, then you start explaining it to them when they get older,” he said.

Then maybe they become coin collectors. If so, they’ve started out with the type of coin collection that they can easily pursue.

“If  you do a collection, you can find a lot of the pennies just in your change every day,” Belleau said. “If you want to find one you can’t find in the change, you come to the show.”

And, if collectors want to talk over their hobby with other enthusiasts year round, they can join a local club, be it the Fairfield Coin Club or the Vallejo Numismatic Society or The Solano Silver Round Club. Go to www.solanocoinclub.com for more information.

Reach Barry Eberling at 427-6929 or [email protected] Follow him on Twitter at www.twitter.com/beberlingdr

Barry Eberling

Barry Eberling

Barry Eberling has been a reporter with the Daily Republic since 1987. He covers Solano County government, transportation, growth and the environment. He received his bachelors of art degree from the University of California, Santa Barbara and his masters degree in journalism from the University of California, Berkeley.
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  • P.J.August 11, 2014 - 9:51 am

    I went to the show just to "look" and was amazed at what is collectable! I had a great time just talking to the dealers who were very nice, answered my questions, offered advice. Thanks to all....

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