FAIRFIELD-SUISUN, CALIFORNIA

Fairfield

Council rejects bids for Dunnell Nature Park in Fairfield

By From page A3 | April 16, 2014

FAIRFIELD — All bids for the Dunnell Nature Park off Hilborn Road were rejected Tuesday by the City Council after an Alameda County-based labor management cooperative asked for another look at the low bidder on the project.

Pat Wirsing of the Northern California Electrical Construction Industry Labor Management Cooperative Trust said a court has assessed a $50,000 wage penalty against D.L. Falk Construction in Hayward, which submitted the $2.7 million low bid.

The labor management group, which describes itself as working to ensure fair bidding in public contracts and monitoring more than 1,000 public construction projects yearly, protested the bid award to Falk.

David Falk told the council that he pays the prevailing wage but that a subcontractor certified the payroll on a previous project.

“I can’t control that,” he said of a falsified document.

Falk said he has an open shop and that unions have chased him for two years even though he uses a lot of union labor.

The city received seven bids ranging from Falk’s low bid to a high bid of $3.5 million. Rejecting the bids requires the city to rebid the project.

The Dunnell family bequeathed the 7.8-acre property to the city for recreation and education. The development includes renovating the main residence at the site into a nature center and demolishing a second family residence because of seismic issues.

An Education Center is planned as part of the park construction. The center and grounds will be the site of the Life After School Program for Rolling Hills Elementary.

Reach Ryan McCarthy at 427-6935 or [email protected]

Ryan McCarthy

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  • LilApril 16, 2014 - 9:29 am

    If this goes through, give a year and it will be like every other park in Fairfield. Homeless using it as a toilet, syringes every where, gangs of tuffs hanging out. What is the plan to keep this nature center free of all that?

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