Sunday, December 21, 2014
FAIRFIELD-SUISUN, CALIFORNIA
99 CENTS

Fairfield police, residents join forces to stop crime

grande_meeting_12_18_12

Grande Circle area resident Donna Rucker, center, speaks at a community meeting with police at Grande Circle in Fairfield Tuesday. (Robinson Kuntz/Daily Republic)

By
From page A1 | December 29, 2012 |

FAIRFIELD — It’s no secret that the Grande Circle neighborhood has its share of problems.

The public knows it from years of reading headlines about homicides and drug-related crimes taking place there.

The residents know it, as they live in the area full of apartments and condos and deal with many from out of the area who hang out there.

The police know it, having upped patrol there over the past few years, which according to residents, has helped greatly.

A new approach by the city is bringing those groups together to communicate. The plan is to use the partnership to build a long-term relationship to curb crime and increase safety overall in the east Fairfield neighborhood.

That was the scene recently as police set up neighborhood meetings in areas such as Grande and Villa circles and Dana Drive. Instead of being tucked away in a meeting room, the group met out in the street. The areas were lit up with floodlights and a microphone made the conversation audible for those in complexes.

It was announced that a neighborhood cleanup event has been scheduled for Jan. 12, 2013, for both the Villa and Grande areas. The event will be based out of Major Market and is set to kick off at 10 a.m. There will be a barbecue in the lot for those who help.

For Tom Johnson, the gesture by police and city staff is going a long way. As president of the homeowners association for Grande Circle 2, he regularly keeps up with people in the area. That includes calling police when something doesn’t look right.

“I’m one to speak up when it’s time. I’m old school,” Johnson said. “This is my neighborhood.”

Johnson attended the second such meeting at Grande with police and welcomed their return. He said Crime Prevention Specialist Jeff Conner has done a good job in communicating with residents and kept his word when talking about making changes.

“I get the feeling he’s sincere in what he’s saying. He’s being very straightforward,” Johnson said. “These community meetings are certainly showing some success. Everyone is encouraged to directly deal with police.”

A man stood up during that meeting to say his house had been burglarized, wondering how none of his neighbors saw anything. That’s when a woman stood up and said she lived near him, letting him know she or her husband would keep an eye out in the future.

That’s the kind of interaction police are hoping to foster, Conner said. As a crime prevention specialist, he often works with neighborhoods to create watch programs. Conner has led the public safety meetings and said the interaction between residents is just as important as talking with officers.

“It’s exactly what we are looking for,” Conner said about the exchange between the neighbors. “Had that meeting never occurred, who knows if they would have ever talked.”

Aside from just their presence at the meeting, Conner said the department is working toward trust, something he said can be a challenge in these areas. By coming back for repeated meetings, Conner is able to gauge whether what police are doing is actually working.

The ultimate plan is to enlist neighborhood leaders who will take over the responsibility of working with police and being a point of contact.

“What we are trying to do is build a bank of trust,” Conner said. “Not everyone trusts the Police Department. We know that.”

Going into the neighborhoods began as a vision of City Manager Sean Quinn and his staff, said Dawn LaBar, Fairfield’s legislative and special project manager.

To apply for federal Community Development Block Grants, several areas that have low-income residents and high crime were identified and studied. Several areas in town fit that description and soon there was around $100,000 in grant money coming the city’s way.

The whole process is new and LaBar said everyone is learning as they go along.

“This isn’t coming from a checklist or a textbook,” she said. “It comes from a genuine care and love for this city.”

LaBar said grant money is to be used in public areas to increase safety and lower crime. That means the city can’t use it to improve anything within the complexes or parking lots of the troubled units.

The city recently paid for security cameras and other measures outside of Parkway Gardens with the grants. Now there are early talks of using funds to create a lighted crosswalk across East Tabor Avenue near Major Market. All grant purchases must be approved by the Fairfield City Council.

LaBar said working with neighborhoods has become a priority and that residents are starting to respond to the city’s gestures. She said most of the crime is done by a small percentage of residents and people who don’t live in the area and are there to create mischief.

“It’s just the small that represent all. People want to have ownership of their neighborhood,” LaBar said. “We just need one leader, and one voice. These are the neighborhoods where the residents are speaking out and asking for help. It’s such a big thing to know that people are hearing them.”

Reach Danny Bernardini at 427-6935 or dbernardini@dailyrepublic.net. Follow him on Twitter at www.twitter.com/dbernardinidr.

Danny Bernardini

Danny Bernardini

Danny is a newspaper man born and raised in Vacaville. He attended Chico State University and has written for the Enterprise Record and the Reporter. Covers the City of Fairfield, education and crime. A's, Warriors and Saints fan. Listener of vinyl, frequent visitor to the East Bay. Registered "decline to state" voter. Loves a good steak.
LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | 6 comments

The Daily Republic does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

  • Rich GiddensDecember 29, 2012 - 7:25 am

    Really? Let's see California-- Welfare State + Police State = one messed up bankrupt undesirable state!

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • AntwanDecember 29, 2012 - 10:19 pm

    When does your trial start?

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Tom JohnsonDecember 29, 2012 - 7:45 am

    I'd like to thank Danny Bernardini and the Daily Republic for passing on the news of the efforts of the Fairfield Police Department and the Grande Circle neighborhood to improve our community and make it a place we can be proud of. I look forward to future reports of our efforts. Tom Johnson

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • TylerDecember 29, 2012 - 8:43 am

    These neighborhood meetings out in the street where even those who don't attend must know they're happening? A BRILLIANT idea!! This is great and I also applaud the city and its officers for their creative thinking and initiative. Keep it up!

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Fairfield ResidentDecember 29, 2012 - 9:08 am

    I love it! Great managers with a positive, pro-active vision to improve the city! Chief Tibbet has shown this in so many other aspects of police outreach to the community. Sean Quinn is an outstanding city manager. Thank you, Danny Bernadini, for the insight you provide with your news stories. ...Change takes time. I hope there is enough resolve to stay with the turn around so it becomes permanent. And I hope the residents remember to thank the neighbors that help them.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • badgebunnyDecember 29, 2012 - 10:00 am

    I wouldn't mind getting up close and personal with Officer Pulsipher!

    Reply | Report abusive comment
.

Solano News

The Salvation Army serves 1,000-plus across 2 days

By Susan Hiland | From Page: A1, 7 Comments | Gallery

 
Blue Christmas service offers reflection, hope

By Amy Maginnis-Honey | From Page: A1

Shining bright for all to see: Locals deck out yards, homes

By Amy Maginnis-Honey | From Page: C1, 1 Comment | Gallery

 
Time for annual Solano County quiz

By Brad Stanhope | From Page: A2

Bevy of holiday activities at Western Railway Museum

By Amy Maginnis-Honey | From Page: A3 | Gallery

 
State Fair scholarship applications available

By Amy Maginnis-Honey | From Page: A3

 
Get tested, know your status

By Morgan Westfall | From Page: C4

 
Free New Year’s celebration slated

By Amy Maginnis-Honey | From Page: A5

 
 
New development fees start Jan. 1 in Vacaville

By Amy Maginnis-Honey | From Page: A5

A word of warning for Senator Warren

By Bud Stevenson | From Page: B7, 11 Comments

 
New technology chief will join McNaughton Newspapers

By Tanya Perez | From Page: B7 | Gallery

 
Fairfield police log: Dec. 19, 2014

By Susan Hiland | From Page: A9

Suisun City police log: Dec. 19, 2014

By Susan Hiland | From Page: A9

 
Sky-high price has VA rationing hep C drug

By Tom Philpott | From Page: B10

.

US / World

Air Force admits nuke flaws, but will fixes work?

By The Associated Press | From Page: A1

 
 
Officials: Missing dog was dyed to deceive

By The Associated Press | From Page: A5

Immigrants build document trails to remain in US

By The Associated Press | From Page: A5

 
California officer kills teen after machete attack

By The Associated Press | From Page: A5, 2 Comments

Design of Golden Gate Bridge suicide barrier OK’d

By The Associated Press | From Page: A5, 1 Comment

 
2 dozen injured in southern Indiana bus crash

By The Associated Press | From Page: A6

 
4 teens die in fiery head-on crash in Pennsylvania

By The Associated Press | From Page: A6

Texas ranchers seeking alternative incomes

By The Associated Press | From Page: A7, 1 Comment

 
North Korea proposes joint probe over Sony hacking

By The Associated Press | From Page: A10

2 car bombs rock southern Sweden’s city of Malmo

By The Associated Press | From Page: A10

 
Bombings kill 12 in Iraq

By The Associated Press | From Page: A10, 1 Comment

US sends 4 Afghans back home from Guantanamo

By The Associated Press | From Page: A10

 
Panama’s Noriega in prison 25 years post-invasion

By The Associated Press | From Page: A10

Burying the dead after Pakistan’s school massacre

By The Associated Press | From Page: A11

 
A chance to breach divide for young in Cuba and US

By The Associated Press | From Page: A12

.

Opinion

Editorial Cartoon: Dec. 21, 2014

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: A8, 1 Comment

 
Season’s greetings from the Obamas

By Alexandra Petri | From Page: A8, 1 Comment

New school finance strategy lacks accountability

By Dan Walters | From Page: A8

 
Sound off for Dec. 21, 2014

By Daily Republic | From Page: A8

 
.

Living

Today in History: Dec. 21, 2014

By The Associated Press | From Page: A2, 4 Comments

 
Community Calendar: Dec. 21, 2014

By Susan Hiland | From Page: A2

Vatican offers olive branch to US nuns

By The Associated Press | From Page: C3, 1 Comment

 
Why celebrate Christmas?

By Noel Reese | From Page: C3, 2 Comments

Horoscopes: Dec. 21, 2014

By Holiday Mathis | From Page: C4

 
Should I ask grandson why we weren’t included in wedding photos?

By Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar | From Page: C4

.

Entertainment

Review: ‘Five’ by Ursula Archer is intriguing

By The Associated Press | From Page: C6

 
PUBLISHERS WEEKLY BEST-SELLERS

By The Associated Press | From Page: C6

Publisher hopes to sell books through Twitter

By The Associated Press | From Page: C6

 
Chris Colfer has multi-book deal

By The Associated Press | From Page: C6

Jerry Lee Lewis: Sustained by brief blaze of glory

By The Associated Press | From Page: C6

 
TVGrid

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B11

.

Sports

New Giants 3B McGehee eager to play back home

By The Associated Press | From Page: B1

 
Interim coaching jobs present challenges in bowls

By The Associated Press | From Page: B1

49ers squander 21-point lead in 4th straight loss

By The Associated Press | From Page: B1

 
No. 11 Lady Vols trounce No. 7 Stanford 59-40

By The Associated Press | From Page: B3

Eagles near elimination, fall 27-24 to Redskins

By The Associated Press | From Page: B3

 
Raiders place cornerback Brown on injured reserve

By The Associated Press | From Page: B3

Big moves bring big hope for Chicago baseball

By The Associated Press | From Page: B4

 
US skier Nyman wins Gardena downhill for 3rd time

By The Associated Press | From Page: B4

Vonn wins women’s World Cup downhill in France

By The Associated Press | From Page: B4

 
This date in sports history for Sunday, Dec. 21, 2014

By The Associated Press | From Page: B5

 
.

Business

 
Your info has been hacked. Now what do you do?

By The Associated Press | From Page: B7

On the money: 4 ways to hold on to your cash when renting a car

By The Associated Press | From Page: B7

 
Recalls this week: Bean bag chairs, toy monkeys

By The Associated Press | From Page: B8

 
Scarecrows outnumber people in dying Japan town

By The Associated Press | From Page: B12

.

Obituaries

Dominic C. Scolaro

By Nancy Green | From Page: A4

 
Barbara Jean Bidstrup Braker

By Nancy Green | From Page: A4

Perry Michael Smetts

By Nancy Green | From Page: A4

 
Luzdivina B. Banks

By Susan Hiland | From Page: A4

Arnold Howard Evans

By Susan Hiland | From Page: A4

 
Anthony Hanson Elder

By Susan Hiland | From Page: A4

.

Comics