Sunday, December 21, 2014
FAIRFIELD-SUISUN, CALIFORNIA
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How government controls inflation

By
From page B7 | January 27, 2013 |

The figure $17 billion is probably stuck in the interested  public’s mind. It represents, of course, the amount the United States government owes to various entities beyond its current ability to pay.

Let me correct that. Naturally, it could pay the whole thing to debt-holders – foreign and domestic. The problem is we would have to “create” the money to pay the amount we are indebted, and in doing so we would create a vast amount of inflation. Inflation is the rate, or amount, your dollar loses in buying power. If it happens slowly, over time, it generally does not cause panic.

During the 1950s, the inflation rate was about 1.5 percent. To figure the number of years it will take for your currency to lose half its value, you divide the annual rate of loss into 72. For example, during the last Carter years, when oil prices were helping to push prices up over 12 percent, if that rate had continued, dividing 12 into 72, our currency would have lost half its value in six years.

As you know, the most notorious inflation of the past 100 years happened in Germany during the early 1920s, when, for example, it took a trillion marks – a mark was formerly worth something around a dollar – to mail a letter. It was said that housewives who had to use laundromats had to carry more weight in their baskets in currency than in unwashed clothes. What that horrific inflation led to is well known to most of us.

What all this means is that we have to be very careful when we borrow money or we could find that the dollar erodes faster than anyone expects. So why, you might ask, does the Federal Reserve allow any inflation at all by issuing more dollars than can be backed by real assets? Their argument is that a “small” amount of inflation is a spur to employment and a strong economy. The worry is that what starts out as “tame” or “acceptable” inflation gets out of hand and cannot be reined in.

This is more likely to happen when there is another factor involved, such as we saw with oil in the 1970s. If I’m not mistaken, even though the economy was “booming” during World War II, prices were held down by government fiat. Would we accept a federal noose around prices if inflation got out of hand?

Historically, farmers have been in favor of free-moving prices, while consumers of goods – individual or commercial – do not like to see prices get out of hand. One of the arguments offered by Detroit when the Japanese started exporting cars to the U.S. was that Japanese pricing would be a threat to the American economy. The same has been said of the vast amount of U.S. manufacturing that has been shifted to China, Korea, Singapore and Japan. The fact that at the same time that American workers in those industries have been losing jobs, prices to consumers have been holding steady or even dropping.

What all this means is that the responsible powers – the Fed, the White House, and Congress – will have to act carefully to make sure prices do not get out of control. That means saying “no” to those who want more money. Programs cannot be funded at a rate faster than the increase in inflation.

Bud Stevenson, a stockbroker, lives in Fairfield. Reach him at Bsteven254@aol.com.

 

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Discussion | 5 comments

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  • G-ManJanuary 26, 2013 - 10:19 pm

    17Billion Buddy?..didn't you mean Trillion?.I hope you execute trades better than that..17Billion is what the White House spends on flowers..Throw in entitlements going forward and noting that gov't estimates that welfare will increase 80% that's 80..Buddyboy in the next ten years..we got some problems..I'm still trying to figure out how obama's rich tax that will collect 840Billion over 10yrs will do anything for the expenses of gov't that if going the way they are will add up to about 44TRILLION..yep TRILLION over the next ten years.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Danny BuntinJanuary 27, 2013 - 12:43 pm

    The main reason for inflation is the banks producing absolutely nothing, yet taking the cream off the top of the economy. After they are done with it, they then pass it down to main street. When will we wake up, and realize the fraud by the banks and the central bank structure. The best way to rob a bank is to own one.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • StRJanuary 27, 2013 - 12:50 pm

    Very Good.....I agree

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Read Web of Debt by Ellen BrownJanuary 27, 2013 - 1:24 pm

    Google...The Single Chart That Should Force The Fed Out Of Business Daily Bail January 26, 2013

    Reply | Report abusive comment
  • Book....The Bankers Who Broke the WorldJanuary 27, 2013 - 2:00 pm

    By....By Liaquat Ahamed....Although “Lords of Finance” is much more than a personality-driven book, it has personalities to spare. The four men and their distinctive strategies are wonderfully drawn. If only by virtue of the velvet-collared cape and fan-backed oriental chair he used as accoutrements at a top-secret 1927 meeting on Long Island, Montagu Norman of the Bank of England emerges as this book’s most exotic figure. The meeting led the Federal Reserve System of the United States to cut interest rates by half a percentage point to prop up the British pound. That it might have been “the pivotal moment, the turning point that set in train the fateful sequence of events that would eventually lead the world into depression,” is in no way trivialized by Mr. Ahamed’s emphasis on Norman’s peculiar personal style................. With the angrily Prussian-mannered Hjalmar Schacht of the Reichsbank, the conniving Émile Moreau of the Banque de France and Benjamin Strong of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York as its other principals, and with Winston Churchill, John Maynard Keynes and Franklin D. Roosevelt among its secondary players, “Lords of Finance” tracks the shifting balance of economic power that reflected each country’s self-interested agenda. But one of the book’s most important points is that self-interest, in the world of global economic fluctuations, can be self-defeating.

    Reply | Report abusive comment
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