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Daily Republic poised for ‘revolutionary change’

Daily Republic news editor Brad Stanhope, left, talks with the McNaughton Newspaper Group's vice president of digital media, Joe Boydston, and director of online stategies, Dean Royal, in the Daily Republic newsroom Tuesday. (Brad Zweerink/Daily Republic)

Daily Republic news editor Brad Stanhope, left, talks with the McNaughton Newspaper Group's vice president of digital media, Joe Boydston, and director of online stategies, Dean Royal, in the Daily Republic newsroom Tuesday. (Brad Zweerink/Daily Republic)

By
May 10, 2011 |

FAIRFIELD — The Daily Republic will leap into the future late Wednesday when it launches a new website that reflects an entirely new way of publishing the newspaper.

The website is powered by WordPress, a mature, open-source blogging platform that has been significantly enhanced to accommodate the needs of the newsroom and the community.

Daily Republic reporters, photographers and editors will produce all local content online, which means local news, features, sports and opinion pieces will publish on the new website in a much more timely manner than was possible with the former website.

This transformation will see the Daily Republic become a true Web-first news site, with local content published soon after it’s created. The best that’s available on the website will then be curated for publication in the print edition. The DR’s print and delivery schedule will not change.

“Our new site will enable us to engage with our community better than ever,” said Brad Stanhope, the Daily Republic’s online editor for the transition to the new technology. “We see dailyrepublic.com as a place where people not only get informed, but debate, engage and connect with each other.”

The new website maintains the comfortable read of the print edition, from the home page through to the individual stories. It also provides greater access for readers. Subscribers will be able to view local news anywhere, at any time. That includes mobile devices.

Development was led by Joe Boydston, vice president of digital media for McNaughton Newspapers, and Dean Royal, the company’s director of online strategies. The process involved a complete upgrade of computer hardware and software in the newsroom.

“Over the past six months we’ve successfully harnessed a front-runner in open-source publishing technologies and ignited new spirits of optimism within McNaughton,” Royal said. “In the next six months the readership of our news will quadruple and our community interaction will double. It’s exhilarating to be part of such an extraordinary evolutionary change.”

Boydston describes the new website as Daily Republic 2.0.

“We are adjusting our priorities to better serve Solano County,” he said. “I describe what we are doing as ‘digital native.’ We simply publish, early and often.”

“This is more than a website,” he said. “It is our entire existence, the whole of our journalistic efforts. Everything we do, say, print and publish exists here. We write and edit news stories live on the Internet, hours or days before they appear in the printed newspaper.”

There are also financial benefits that will pay dividends for readers.

“Instead of spending huge amounts of money on proprietary software, we choose to invest in the people who make the Daily Republic the award-winning newspaper it is,” Boydston said. “Today’s dailyrepublic.com was created with 100 percent open-source software, much of it developed internally by Daily Republic staff.”

As with any technological change, there are some drawbacks. For example, comments posted on the current website will not be viewable on the new website. In that sense, the new website is a clean slate. Beginning shortly after 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, readers can make use of enhanced commenting capabilities. Those comments will remain linked to stories indefinitely.

The Daily Republic is the third McNaughton Newspapers publication to make the transition. The Mountain Democrat in Placerville made the switch in October, and The Davis Enterprise made the conversion in February.

“I am extremely proud of both our technology and editorial teams. This is cutting edge work that has taken enormous effort,” said Foy McNaughton, publisher of the Daily Republic and president and chief executive officer of McNaughton Newspapers. “Tremendous credit goes to Joe Boydston, who kept us all focused during this revolutionary change.”

Reach Glen Faison at 427-6925 or gfaison@dailyrepublic.net.

Glen Faison

Glen Faison

Glen Faison joined the Daily Republic as managing editor in September 2009. He has worked as a reporter and editor for daily and weekly newspapers in the San Joaquin Valley for 20-plus years. His experience includes time as editor of the Golden Eagle, a military paper serving the Lemoore Naval Air Station. He graduated from Fresno State University with a bachelor's degree in journalism and bleeds Bulldogs red. He is an avid Washington Redskins fan, and attended the 1988 NFC Championship Game against the Minnesota Vikings at RFK Stadium. He married his wife, Jill, in 2005, and has three children: Courtni, Tyler and Hayli.
LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | 26 comments

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  • Cy NicalMay 11, 2011 - 6:40 pm

    I'm LOVING the new site! Great job DR!

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  • Glen FaisonMay 11, 2011 - 8:35 pm

    Thank you!

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  • RyanMay 11, 2011 - 10:07 pm

    Website looks wonderful! Bravo! Quick question: When will the Daily Republic be releasing its internally developed open-source source code for the new site? And under what license -- GPLv2, GPLv3, BSD, the PHP License, etc.? Mr. Boydston indicates in the article, "Today’s dailyrepublic.com was created with 100 percent open-source software, much of it developed internally by Daily Republic staff." Where can the source be downloaded?

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  • Joe BoydstonMay 13, 2011 - 11:42 pm

    Ryan, we use a large collection of programs that make up the whole of our online operation. There is no single download for the whole site. Most of the code is licensed under GPL2 or MIT license. The majority of the software we run is available for download through the wordpress SVN repository, or forked on github.

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  • DanaMay 12, 2011 - 9:48 am

    I like it!

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  • RyanMay 12, 2011 - 4:09 pm

    My previous comment does not express an idle curiosity about a technical issue. The above article claims the DR's new website is 100 percent open source. If that is true, the source code must be made available; that is what "open source" means. If it is not true -- if the DR's internally developed add-on code to Wordpress is proprietary, and there's no shame in that -- then the paper must issue a correction. It would also serve the paper's interest to clarify Mr. Royal's claim that, “In the next six months the readership of our news will quadruple and our community interaction will double." Leaving aside the murky issue of quantifying "community interaction," surely Mr. Royal can't mean that newspaper subscriptions will quadruple. Does he think website traffic will increase by such an astounding figure solely on the basis of a site redesign? Frankly, that strains credulity, and readers are owed an explanation for the basis of the claim. The new website looks great. The Daily Republic is to be lauded for utilizing open source software and making a geniune and substantial effort to better serve its readers. However, the above article illustrates the potential pitfalls of a newspaper writing articles about itself, especially self-congratulatory articles. The requisite journalistic standards of objectivity and skepticism appear to have given way to cheerleading and unsubstantiated claims. Someone should have stepped back and said, "Wait a minute. Is this true?" It's not too late to do just that. The DR needs to produce journalism worthy of its new website. So I say again: release the source code or write a prompt correction.

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  • The SugarJarMay 12, 2011 - 8:00 pm

    I don't think that's quite what the term "open source" means.

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  • RobMay 13, 2011 - 12:22 am

    So, will this new technology fix the horrible editing and typos that plague this 'award' winning paper?

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  • Glen FaisonMay 13, 2011 - 12:30 am

    Rob, you've hit on something that's the bane of most community newspapers, that is, dealing with a great deal of information on a daily basis, and trying to do so with as few errors as possible. It's a constant concern, and one we take seriously.

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  • ShawnMay 13, 2011 - 12:37 am

    Yes it is, SugarJar. Open Source software is software whose code is freely distributed. There are many different open source licenses, but that's the nut of the matter. (The Open Source Initiative's definition can be found here: http://www.opensource.org/osd.html. They also have a list of licenses here: http://www.opensource.org/licenses/index.html.) Wordpress is proudly open source (http://codex.wordpress.org/License). You can download the program and source (which come to the same thing) here: http://wordpress.org/latest.zip. The Daily Republic also uses an open source Wordpress plugin called EditFlow. You can download it here: http://downloads.wordpress.org/plugin/edit-flow.0.6.3.zip. Wordpress is written largely in PHP, which is itself an open source programming language. It is an uncompiled language, which means that there is no good way to hide the source code when it's distributed. When you download the program, the source code comes with it. If 'much of' the '100 percent open-source software' running the Daily Republic's web site was developed by the Daily Republic, then the Daily Republic has created open source software. And I think that's awesome. Honestly, this isn't that hard.

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  • ShawnMay 13, 2011 - 12:46 am

    Yes it is, SugarJar. Open Source software is software whose code is freely distributed. There are many different open source licenses, but that's the nut of the matter. (The Open Source Initiative's definition can be found here: opensource.org/osd.html. They also have a list of licenses here: opensource.org/licenses/index.html.) Wordpress is proudly open source (codex.wordpress.org/License). You can download the program and source (which come to the same thing) here: wordpress.org/latest.zip. The Daily Republic also uses an open source Wordpress plugin called EditFlow. You can download it here: downloads.wordpress.org/plugin/edit-flow.0.6.3.zip. Wordpress is written largely in PHP, which is itself an open source programming language. It is an uncompiled language, which means that there is no good way to hide the source code when it's distributed. When you download the program, the source code comes with it. If 'much of' the '100 percent open-source software' running the Daily Republic's web site was developed by the Daily Republic, then the Daily Republic has created open source software. And I think that's awesome. Honestly, this isn't that hard.

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  • LauraMay 13, 2011 - 8:41 am

    Wonderful change. It's now enjoyable to read the DR website.

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  • V MMay 13, 2011 - 8:51 am

    Could you please tell me where I can find the sports sign-up page. Before I could see what was being offered for sports in our area, softball, baseball, fishing, golfing etc... where is that located now in this new format?

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  • ShawnMay 13, 2011 - 9:33 pm

    I'm genuinely puzzled why the Daily Republic isn't responding on this issue. (They didn't respond to my email either.) On Joe Boydston's blog (http://www.joeboydston.com/blog/rebooting-californias-oldest-newspaper/), he says the "most notable enhancement" to Wordpress for McNaughton Newspaper websites, of which the DR is one, is EditFlow. So my guess (and that's all I can hazard since the paper isn't responding) is that EditFlow is the open source software Boydston was talking about in the above article. If this is the case, two issues crop up. (1) None of the four listed authors of EditFlow (http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/edit-flow/) are Daily Republic staff. Mohammad Jangda is in Toronto, Daniel Bachhuber is in Brooklyn, N.Y., sbressler is in Seattle, Wash., and Andrew Spittle is in Portland, Ore. Jangda writes on his website (http://digitalize.ca/development/) that EditFlow is an "on-going project done in conjunction with the smart kids at CoPress." Bachhuber and Spittle work(ed) for CoPress, whose mission is/was to "empower student newsrooms to hack the future of journalism." CoPress went out of business in March. A little googling revealed that Boydston won a $10,000 Knight Foundation News Challenge grant in 2009 to create a CMS Upload Utility (http://www.newschallenge.org/winner/cms-upload-utility). Perhaps that project evolved into EditFlow, with the Daily Republic sensibly contracting out the programming. Boydston discusses the project with EditFlow developers at http://groups.google.com/group/editflow/. Of course, there is nothing wrong or improper about any of this. However, when Boydston says of the new website that "much of it [was] developed internally by Daily Republic staff," he says something false. And something he had to know to be false. Which leads us to the second point having to do with the word "much." (2) In peeking at the Daily Republic website's source code, it appears as though in addition to Wordpress and Editflow the paper uses a plugin called Jetpack, a Wordpress theme called Transcript by developer gabfire (http://www.gabfirethemes.com/transcript), OpenX 2.8.4, which is advertising software, and software by Global Multimedia Protocols Group called XHTML Friends Network. I'm sure the paper uses a lot of other software besides. Just taking Wordpress, Jetpack and EditFlow and comparing the uncompressed file sizes of each software package, which is an admittedly crude metric, we get the following: Wordpress = 8.6 MB Jetpack = 1.4 MB EditFlow = 1 MB This means that even if EditFlow were 100% developed by DR staff, which it wasn't, it would constitute less than 10% of the total contribution to the site. I realize that since the DR editors, writers, photographers, etc. interface principally with EditFlow, it may seem a greater contribution. But the fact of the matter is that readers interface mostly with gabfire's modified Transcript theme, which the Daily Republic had to have purchased. In light of this, the statement that "much" of the new site was developed by DR staff seems even less plausible. I would be thrilled if someone from the DR would reply to this post. I would love it if I were wrong, if there were some facts that I'm unaware of that reveal Boydston's statement to be true. I implore the DR to provide them. In the absence of that, I'll echo the sentiment expressed above and humbly suggest that a correction seems in order.

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  • Joe BoydstonMay 13, 2011 - 11:23 pm

    Shawn - It's nice to hear from you again. Sorry for the tardy response, It's been an incredibly busy week at the Daily Republic with the website launch, new editorial computer system and ad serving platform. Wow, a question about open source software, cool! I've helped launch this platform at three other newspapers, but I've never been asked a question about the software. The web page you are reading now (on dailyrepublic.com) reflects roughly a quarter of the total investment we made in our open source software system. We have more than 30 projects in active development that serve various departments at the Daily Republic. As with most modern websites, the portion accessible by the public is only the tip of the iceberg. There is easily 25 times that much code on the back end that runs dailyrepublic.com, but is invisible to your browser. An example of this is software that we run behind the scenes that moves content from one computer system to another. This directly effects how stories appear on the website. But the software is not running ON the public viewable website. All but a few of these projects (the ones is early development phase) are available for download through the Wordpress SVN plugin repository and github. Regarding EditFlow, I am indeed a developer on this project. (I wrote the Editorial Calendar in version .5) We develop out of github now and push changes back to WordPress SVN. Furthermore, we run a highly modified version of EditFlow, forked from version .6. This effort has been evolving since 2001, I assure you that our website software is open source, much of it created in house.

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  • ShawnMay 14, 2011 - 2:16 am

    Hi Joe, Thank you sincerely for replying during what must be a very busy time for you. I take your point about there being lots and lots of software running behind the scenes that is effectively invisible to users. The DR web server appears to be run by a bounty of open source software -- Apache, Debian GNU/Linux, PHP, Python, OpenSSL, etc. There's probably a MySQL server running as well. That's great, and, obviously, not apparent just by peeking at the site html. So I understand that the Daily Republic's open source contributions can be substantial without being evident, which is precisely why I'm asking what exactly those contributions are. You indicate that there are "more than 30 projects in active development" and that "All but a few of these projects ... are available for download through the WordPress SVN plugin repository and github." But how do I find them on those sites? What are they called? I'm not asking in an effort to play "gotcha" or count up lines of code. I'm genuinely interested in looking at and playing with the code. And in the context of the story above, these are questions that should be answerable. I don't doubt the sincerity of your post (or your programming chops), but I'm not looking for assurances that the website is open source. I'm looking for the actual source. But the good news is that it sounds like it's just a matter of you pointing me toward it.

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  • ChrisMay 14, 2011 - 4:51 pm

    Great Job on the new site Daily Republic! I too would love to see Shawn's questions answered and see links to the source code. If you are going to claim you are open source then we need to see it. One further thought. I find it annoying to click on the media gallery and end up at the page of only one photo rather than a slideshow. I like the look of the photo pages and I wish there was a way to just view all photos and browse through them one after the other. I am a former DR photographer and I love the work the the current photo staff is doing - hopefully it will continue to be highlighted on the site. Hopefully you will achieve your goal of quadrupling your readership and you will use the resulting revenue to invest in covering important Solano county news.

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  • Joe BoydstonMay 14, 2011 - 9:09 pm

    dailyrepublic.com is produced using several different software package, it's a machine made of many moving parts. Here are a few of the most recognizable pieces. Please refer to my blog for further detail, or contact me directly. Server Operating System http://www.ubuntu.com/ http://www.debian.org/ WebServer http://nginx.org/ Application Framework http://wordpress.org/ WordPress theme template http://www.gabfirethemes.com/ Our customized EditFlow Branch https://github.com/dkukral/edit-flow-fork CMS UTILITY - File management https://github.com/dkukral/cms_utility Print Tags http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/print-tags/ Export Posts (don't let the simple title fool you, this is the backbone of our workflow) http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/export-posts/ And much, much more. I plan to blog about this process in the coming weeks. Hopefully this will whet your appetite. Thanks again for your interest.

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  • ShawnMay 15, 2011 - 4:08 am

    Joe: I'm sorry, but this list doesn't cut it - not by a long shot. You said the DR has "more than 30" open source projects in development. You've listed nine projects, five of which are emphatically not Daily Republic software projects, and one of which you mentioned previously. That means you've posted only three new projects. Let's look at your list. () Ubuntu and Debian are operating systems based on the Linux kernel and GNU tools. The Daily Republic does not write this software. () The nginx web server is written by a fellow named Igor Sysoev (http://sysoev.ru/en/), who lives in Moscow. Where is the DR connection? () Wordpress isn't developed by the Daily Republic. () Gabfire themes aren't developed by the Daily Republic. () Print Tags is a very small piece of software, whose version is listed as 0.0. It contains one 261 line PHP file and one 14 line CSS file. Further, in the actual print-tags.php file, the author is listed as Don Kukral. You are listed along with Kukral on the Wordpress plugin page, so I take it you are co-authors. () Export Posts is also a very small piece of software, consisting of a 64 line PHP file and a 245 line PHP file. () The link to the CMS Utility appears to be broken. (Edit: It is now working; Don Kukral is listed as author of PHP files.) () As for the fork of EditFlow on github (https://github.com/dkukral/edit-flow-fork), you are indeed listed as a developer in the README.TXT file, though not in the main edit_flow.php file where the authors are listed as "Daniel Bachhuber, Scott Bressler, Mohammad Jangda, Andrew Spittle, et al." You said you "wrote the Editorial Calendar in version .5," which seems about right. A July 7, 2010, post on Daniel Bachhuber's blog (http://danielbachhuber.com/2010/07/07/edit-flow-v0-5-now-with-a-slick-editorial-calendar/) announced the release of version .5. He wrote, "The most significant new feature is a slick editorial calendar designed by Andrew Spittle, implemented by Joe Boydston, and nitpicked by [Daniel Bachhuber]." The editorial calendar in version .6, which is what is available on github, lists Bachhuber as the author. The calendar.php file in question contains 456 lines of code. The Editflow fork contains 6,626 lines of PHP in total. (I used the following command - awk 'END{print NR}' *.php - to read line counts out of the files to ensure accuracy. I didn't count this stuff by hand.) If we ignore issues of co-authorship and assume that most of what you wrote for calendar.php in .5 made it to .6 (which seems like a stretch since the authorship changed), then the total number of lines of open source PHP code the DR can reasonably take credit for is 1,026. To put this in perspective, the total number of lines of PHP code in a standard download of Wordrpess is 164,176. If we just take your code and the Wordpress code and ignore all the other non-DR open source software running dailyrepublic.com, we get the following: The DR has developed 0.6% of the open source software running its website. The DR has been given ample opportunity to share its source code, and this is all it can produce? Where are the 30 projects you mentioned? When I search the Wordpress plugin site for Joe Boydston (http://profiles.wordpress.org/users/jboydston/), you are listed as being involved in three projects (Print Tags, Export Posts and something called Comment Mixer, which appears to be co-authored with Daniel Bachhuber and currently has no working code). A search for you on github reveals only the forked EditFlow project. The Daily Republic appears to have greatly exaggerated its open source contributions to its own website. And when given the opportunity to acknowledge and correct this, the paper appears to have only exaggerated further.

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  • Glen FaisonMay 14, 2011 - 6:58 pm

    @Chris: I'm sure Brad and his team will start loading up the gallery, and will migrate material from the other WordPress multimedia site as well. The gallery here has a much different look and feel, but will get the job done. I'm glad you're still checking in with us from time to time. You did some outstanding work here. Brad and his team continue to do the same.

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  • TaliaMay 15, 2011 - 8:04 pm

    It's nice to see the DR moving forward with technology! I am looking forward to reading Joe's blog postings to learn more about the open source code created in-house. Per Shawn's comments and the information provided, it does seem as though the quote “Today’s dailyrepublic.com was created with 100 percent open-source software, much of it developed internally by Daily Republic staff” might be a bit misstated. From what I've seen, it appears that the new dailyrepublic.com was created using open source programs created by third parties, but integrates internally developed software from the prior version of the Web site. I would love to read a clarification on this!

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  • Joe BoydstonMay 15, 2011 - 9:47 pm

    Talia, thank you for your interest, you are very close… What we lovingly refer to as Daily Republic 2.0 is a mix of legacy software that we created dating back to 2001, and modern software like WordPress. There is no single downloadable application that would reproduce this website. Most of the software used in the creation of our website on a daily basis is open source. Our older applications were developed 100% in house, only recently have we added a framework like WordPress into the mix. And, about half of our WordPress functionality was created in house. (plugins and theme development) Many of these individual programs are available for download at WordPress.org/extend or github.com. Of course we hope to save money by leveraging open source software, but our motivation runs deeper. We aim to help evolve the field of Journalism. It is in the spirit of collaboration and with great respect for intellectual property that I am proud to be making these contributions to the open source software community. I have not pushed all of our code (about 30 separate projects) to WordPress SVN or GitHub yet, this will be a work in progress. Your patience is appreciated as this evolution unfolds. If you would like an early development copy, please email me directly jboydston at dailyrepublic dot net

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  • ShawnMay 16, 2011 - 3:05 am

    Joe: The DR's desire to benefit the open source software community is laudable. However, software isn't open source until the source is made available; until then it's just software that may become open source at a later date. The Open Source Initiative's "Open Source Definition" is explicit about this (http://www.opensource.org/docs/osd): "The program must include source code, and must allow distribution in source code as well as compiled form. Where some form of a product is not distributed with source code, there must be a well-publicized means of obtaining the source code for no more than a reasonable reproduction cost preferably downloading via the Internet without charge." The Daily Republic has not provided "a well-publicized means of obtaining the source code." So when you say that you have not "pushed all of our code (about 30 separate projects) to WordPress SVN or GitHub yet," that means (by definition) that this is not open source software. It is also worth pointing out that you explicitly claimed in a previous post that "All but a few of these projects (the ones is early development phase) are available for download through the WordPress SVN plugin repository and github." And your statement above that "Most of the software used in the creation of our website on a daily basis is open source" is inconsistent with your statement in the article that "Today’s dailyrepublic.com was created with 100 percent open-source software." The real issue here isn't about the DR's software development practices or plans for the future or its "great respect for intellectual property." It is about the truth or falsity of statements the Daily Republic makes about itself in print and on the web.

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  • ShawnMay 17, 2011 - 4:10 pm

    The Daily Republic has indicated to me in an email -- three days after I first contacted them and six days after the article was published -- that they are unconvinced a correction is in order. This seems rather intransigent. Newspapers bear the burden of producing articles that are factually accurate and free of problematic ambiguity; especially when they are writing about _themselves_ and quoting an _employee_ from the company that owns the newspaper. When some question arises as to the truth or accuracy of a statement, I should think a newspaper would _want_ to set the record straight, not dig in its heels. The following is all the Daily Republic would have to print to set the record straight: ------------------------------------------------------------------- A story in the May 10 Daily Republic contained an error. While all of the third-party software used to create the new dailyrepublic.com is open source, the majority of the website customizations have not been released as open source projects. McNaughton Newspapers intends to release this code under open source licenses in due time. The projects will be posted here [list website]. Additionally, this code was not authored by Daily Republic staff, but rather by McNaughton Newspaper employees and outside contractors. For more information about open source software, visit the Free Software Foundation (www.fsf.org) or the Open Source Initiative (www.opensource.org). ------------------------------------------------------------------- Or something to this effect. The statement above fits the facts infinitely better than the characterization given in the May 10 article, which is not ambiguous, but simply false. (If the paper should see fit to correct itself, it would be better if it did not claim to have 30 open source projects in development until it actually posts the lion's share of the code. My view is that the Daily Republic has relinquished the privilege of the benefit of the doubt on these issues.) I am still holding out hope that the Daily Republic will decide that accuracy is more important than saving face.

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  • Rob LizJune 07, 2011 - 5:50 pm

    Or you guys could ...you know...leave Joe alone about this. What does it really matter about open source? You're not going to do anything with it anyway. A little more congratulating on a slicker website and less harassing people about how (cough)knowledgeable(cough) you are on the subject would be great.

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  • CuriousJune 04, 2012 - 9:15 pm

    So where is the digital edition and how do you find the archives? I hate to say it, but I don't run to the DR online for up-to-date info. I DO check it out for LOCAL stories. I check out the archives every few days. Hopefully, both the digital edition and archives aren't lost in the "code".

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Humphrey to savor Hall of Fame day with ‘wingman’

By The Associated Press | From Page:

 
Rays’ Archer: ‘Never saw Hank Aaron flip his bat’

By The Associated Press | From Page:

 
Reed HOF induction gives Bills cause to celebrate

By The Associated Press | From Page: | Gallery

In the Pits: Gordon eyeing 5th title after big Brickyard win

By Jenna Fryer | From Page: | Gallery

 
Marketing agreement an obstacle in US bid for 2024

By The Associated Press | From Page:

Sailors to navigate dirty water in 1st Rio test

By The Associated Press | From Page:

 
Manningham back with Giants, with no guarantees

By The Associated Press | From Page:

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Business

Contracts to buy US homes slip in June

By The Associated Press | From Page: | Gallery

 
FAA proposes to fine Southwest Airlines $12M

By The Associated Press | From Page: | Gallery

Stocks pause as traders await key economic news

By The Associated Press | From Page:

 
Zillow buying Trulia to build real estate titan

By The Associated Press | From Page: | Gallery

Dollar Tree steps up fight, buys Family Dollar

By The Associated Press | From Page: | Gallery

 
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Obituaries

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Comics

B.C. July 29

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B4

 
Get Fuzzy July 29

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B4

Baldo July 29

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B4

 
Baby Blues July 29

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B4

Rose is Rose July 29

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B4

 
Zits July 29

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B4

Crossword July 29

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B5

 
Garfield July 29

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B4

Pickles July 29

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B4

 
Beetle Bailey July 29

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B4

Frank and Ernest July 29

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B4

 
Word Sleuth July 29

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B5

Peanuts July 29

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B4

 
Cryptoquote July 29

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B5

For Better or Worse July 29

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B4

 
Bridge July 29

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B5

Wizard of Id July 29

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B4

 
Dilbert July 29

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B4

Sally Forth July 29

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B4

 
Blondie July 29

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B4

Sudoku July 29

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B5