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Walmart and Target: A tale of 2 discounters

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From page B6 | November 16, 2012 | 1 Comment

NEW YORK (AP) — This holiday season, the biggest discount chains in the U.S. will tell the tale of two very different shoppers: those that have and those that have not.

Wal-Mart Stores Inc., the world’s largest retailer, on Thursday acknowledged that its low-income shoppers continue to struggle in the economy and issued an outlook for the fourth quarter – which encompasses the holiday shopping period – that fell below Wall Street estimates. On the same day, its smaller rival Target Corp., which caters to more affluent shoppers, said it expects results during the quarter to exceed the Street’s projections.

The two discounters offer valuable insight into how Americans will be spending in November and December, a period that’s traditionally the busiest shopping period of the year. Some merchants depend on the holiday shopping season for up to 40 percent of their annual sales, but economists watch it to get a temperature reading on the overall mood of Americans.

Walmart and Target’s forecasts seem to solidify a trend that has been taking shape over during the economic downturn. Well-heeled shoppers spend more freely as the economy begins to show new signs of life, whileconsumers in the lower-income brackets continue to hold tight to their purse strings even as the housing and stock markets rebound.

Indeed, while both Walmart and Target are discounters, they cater to very different customers. Walmart, which says its customers’ average household income ranges from $30,000 to $60,000, hammers its low-price message and focuses on stocking basics like T-shirts and underwear along with household goods. But Target, whose customers have a median household income of $64,000 a year, is known for carrying discounted designer clothes and home decor under the same roof as detergent and dishwashing liquid.

Even the tone the retailers struck on Thursday was different. Charles Holley, Walmart’s chief financial officer, told reporters during a call that the retailer’s consumers are still worried about high unemployment and higher basic costs for things like gas. He said he worries that they also will have some anxiety over big tax increases and spending cuts – known as the “fiscal cliff” – that will take effect in January unless Congress and the White House reach a budget deal by then.

“Macroeconomic conditions continue to pressure our customers,” Holley said.

Meanwhile, Gregg Steinhafel, chairman and president of Target, told investors: “We feel good about our ability to deliver inspiring merchandise, most-wanted gifts, and unbeatable value, while also generating expected profitability.”

The fortunes of the two retailers have changed during the economic downturn. In fact, throughout most of it, Target and Walmart have played a bit of musical chairs.

Walmart at first fared well during the downturn as affluent shoppers traded down to its stores. But the company eventually began to lose some of its core low-income shoppers in the process.

The company, based in Bentonville, Ark., posted nine consecutive quarters of revenue declines in its U.S. namesake business as it moved away from its lowest prices strategy and got rid of thousands of basic items its core customers covet in an effort to de-clutter the stores.

Walmart’s namesake U.S. business, which began re-emphasizing low prices and restocked shelves in 2010, has reversed the decline last year. The business has recorded five consecutive quarters of gains in revenue at stores open at least a year, an indicator of a retailer’s health.

But its momentum has slowed. Walmart said Thursday that its namesake U.S. business had a 1.5 percent increase in revenue at stores open at least a year. But the gain is short of the 1.8 percent increase Wall Street expected. It’s also a slowdown in growth from the 2.2 percent gain the business posted in the second quarter and the 2.6 percent increase it had in the first quarter.

“It shows that its consumer is still struggling,” said Ken Perkins, president of Retail Metrics, a research company.

Target, based in Minneapolis, initially struggled during the economic slowdown. Its fashion-forward image hurt it during the downturn as people didn’t perceive Target as having the best prices.

But the retailer expanded its food offerings and began to emphasize low prices in its advertising – two things that put it in direct competition with Wal-Mart. It also started a 5 percent discount program for customers who use its branded credit or debit cards.

But its focus on prices and groceries cost it some cachet, and performance has been choppy. The latest results show that Target seems to have found the right balance between fashion and price. Target said Thursday that revenue at stores open at least a year rose 2.9 percent in the third quarter, roughly in line with Wall Street estimates.

For the fourth quarter, which ends in January, Target said that it anticipates adjusted earnings of $1.64 to $1.74 per share. Analysts predict $1.51 per share.

“Looking ahead, we are confident in our holiday merchandising and marketing plans,” Kathee Tesija, Target’s executive vice president of merchandising, told investors on Thursday.

The difference between the two discounters is becoming more apparent during the holiday shopping season, as both discounters are catering to their different customers.

Walmart last week said it will offer deeper discounts and a broader assortment of merchandise. The company also started its holiday layaway program a month earlier than a year ago and lowered its fees for the program from $15 to $5.

The move seems to working. It has booked an additional $300 million in layaway business compared with a year ago. The company will record sales for layaway during the fourth quarter.

Target, on the other hand, is trying to appeal to higher-end shoppers. The retailer is teaming up with luxury merchant Neiman Marcus to offer a limited collection spanning from fashion to sporting goods.

More than 50 products from 24 designers, including Oscar de la Renta and Diane von Furstenberg will be available at both stores and on their websites starting Dec. 1 until they are sold out. Target is also bolstering its home area with names like Nate Berkus, which launched late last month.

Target told investors Thursday that it hasn’t offered layaway like Walmart because its customers haven’t asked for it. Still, the retailer is playing up value.

Target for the first time is matching prices that customers find on identical products at some online competitors this holiday season, including Walmart.com. The price match program, which covers the period from Nov. 1 through Dec. 16, is an attempt to combat the “showrooming” trend in which shoppers use their smartphones while they’re in stores to browse for products at cheaper prices.

Target’s customers may be a little more resilient than Walmart’s to the economy’s woes, but Target officials said that the retailer expects shoppers to remain cautious

“Our research with (customers) indicates they are continuing to shop with discipline, focusing on lists and budgets and occasionally splurging on more discretionary items,” said Target’s Tesija.

The Associated Press

The Associated Press

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Discussion | 1 comment

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  • S KNovember 16, 2012 - 9:13 am

    Well, I for one usually go to WallyWorld, because of their prices, especially for OTC generic drugs and supplements, etc. For example, you take generic 150Mg Zantac daily, Target's will cost you nearly twice as much for HALF as many. But I can see where people are switching to Target, as my Wife has done. Not only is there a difference in their customer's income levels, although not really by that much, but there is a big difference in their CULTURES, Upbringing, especially using common sense, and having poor manners. So many of WalMart type of customers, just let their little BRATS just run around, uncontrolled, totally unruly, with their parents not saying ONE WORD. And not one WalMart employee or manager says anything. I have on a couple of occasions, yelled at a kid, "STOP YOUR RUNNING," with no idea if they understood a single word of ENGLISH. So anyway that is my take on the difference, that being a MAJOR ONE, that has made my Wife switch and she LOVES kids, is a PRE-SCHOOL teacher; and I am sure many many more have switched for that reason also. You hear that WalMart? You want to not lose anymore customers, get those UNRULY BRATS under control!!!!!

    Reply | Report abusive comment
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