Tuesday, October 21, 2014
FAIRFIELD-SUISUN, CALIFORNIA
99 CENTS

Brands use music to speak globally in World Cup

By
From page B10 | June 11, 2014 |

NEW YORK — Companies that are advertising for the World Cup are hoping music will strike a chord with fans globally.

Because the FIFA World Cup, the international soccer tournament that begins on Thursday, is the most popular sports event on the planet, advertisers want to take advantage of the large viewing audience. But the World Cup poses problems for companies that are used to making a splash at big sporting events like the Super Bowl with a pricey 30-second spot.

First off, soccer doesn’t have very many commercial breaks, with two 45-minutes halves played mostly straight through. Additionally, soccer is a global event, so it’s hard to make TV ads that translate across cultures. As a result, brands – both official sponsors and those that just want to capitalize on the event – increasingly are using music to get the world’s attention:

Danone’s Activia yogurt teamed up with Shakira to update her wildly popular 2010 World Cup Song “Waka Waka,” about Africa, with a Brazil-centric video for “La La La.” Coca-Cola made a song in English, “The World is Ours,” and then created 32 local versions, each sung by a local artist in the native language. And Beats by Dre launched a splashy new 5-minute video “The Game Before the Game” that shows soccer stars like Neymar Jr. and many others preparing for game time by listening to “Jungle” by Jamie N Commons & The X Ambassadors.

The move is an effort by companies to try to capture the attention of one of the largest global audiences for any event. In the last World Cup four years ago, 3.2 billion people tuned in, including 909.6 million for the final match, according to FIFA. That’s compared with the 111.5 million people who tuned into the Super Bowl this year.

“Sports is a great unifier and very few sports are as global as the World Cup,” said Allen Adamson, managing director of branding firm Landor Associates. “Music is the other big platform that transcends cultures and languages, so it’s an emotional way to connect with as broad an audience as the World Cup audience is.”

The link between music and the World Cup is nothing new. The tournament has had a theme song since 1962 when “El Rock del Mundial” by Los Ramblers kicked off the 1962 World Cup in Chile. But this year, brand song tie-ins are more popular than this year’s official effort.

FIFA’s “We Are One (Ole Ola),” has been criticized by Brazilians and other soccer fans as being tone deaf to Brazil culture. Critics complain that it is sung by Cuban-American rapper Pitbull and Bronx-born Puerto Rican singer Jennifer Lopez instead of a Brazilian singer (although it does feature Brazilian singer Claudia Leitte); and it is sung mainly in English and Spanish rather than Portuguese.

So marketers have stepped in, and so far, are scoring big. Shakira’s “La La La” video, sponsored by Activia in partnership with the World Food Programme, has garnered 95 million YouTube views since it went up 3 weeks ago. By comparison, the official FIFA song has about 72 million views after five weeks.

“When we heard ‘La La La,’ we immediately knew consumers would be swayed by the rhythm and energy of this song,” said Santiago Mier Albert, general manager of Activia and vice president of marketing of Danone’s fresh dairy products division worldwide.

Coca Cola’s song has hit the top 10 charts in 40 countries worldwide. That is a big step up from their last effort in 2010, “Wavin’ Flag” which was done in 24 versions and charted in 17 countries.

“The World Cup is universal. Music is universal too,” said Joe Belliotti, director of global entertainment marketing at Coca-Cola. “And if you can find that simple melody and simple lyrical idea that can translate and connect with people around the world, that’s the formula we strive for.”

Beats, which is not an official sponsor of the event and refers to its ad as a global campaign featuring the world-known soccer players, has gotten nearly 8 million views after just four days on YouTube. The five-minute ad cinematically shows rituals athletes use to get ready for “The Game Before The Game.” Brazilian soccer star Neymar Jr. takes a motivational call from his father, Serena Williams gets a patriotic manicure, and they all block out distraction with their Beats headphones to the tune of the foot-stomping “Jungle.”

It’s a chance for Beats, which was recently bought by Apple for $3 billion, to step out onto the global stage for the first time, said Barbara Lippert, longtime ad critic and a columnist for Mediapost.com.

“Beats is a company about music, they really know how to make music videos, it’s a smart strategy and beautifully put together,” she said.

 

The Associated Press

The Associated Press

LEAVE A COMMENT

Discussion | No comments

The Daily Republic does not necessarily condone the comments here, nor does it review every post. Read our full policy

.

Solano News

Crime key topic again at Fairfield candidates night

By Ryan McCarthy | From Page: A5, 20 Comments | Gallery

 
 
Dixon corn maze breaks own world record

By Jess Sullivan | From Page: A5, 1 Comment | Gallery

PAL center seeks volunteers

By Jess Sullivan | From Page: A5, 1 Comment

 
Police Department hosts employee recognition event

By Jess Sullivan | From Page: A5

.

US / World

Police say they might have spotted ambush suspect

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

 
Fashion designer Oscar de la Renta dies at 82

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2 | Gallery

Yosemite proposes raising entrance, camping fees

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2, 3 Comments

 
CDC releases revised Ebola gear guidelines

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

Clinton: Midterm elections should motivate women

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2 | Gallery

 
Surfer fends off shark attack with fist, board

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

WWII airman to be buried in Oakland

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2, 1 Comment

 
Brown: California needs long-term vision on water

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2, 4 Comments

Colorado proposes edible pot ban, then retreats

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2, 2 Comments

 
Submarine hunt sends Cold War chill across Baltic

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

Oscar Pistorius to finally learn his sentence

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

 
Youths, tech workers duel over San Francisco field

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

Suspect in Va. abduction charged in DC area rape

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

 
Warming Earth heading for hottest year on record

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2, 1 Comment

Lacking a plan, Abbas opts for rhetoric

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2 | Gallery

 
Police: Indiana suspect hints at more killings

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2 | Gallery

Turkey says it helps Kurdish fighters enter Syria

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

 
Nigeria declared Ebola-free; ‘spectacular success’

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2 | Gallery

Urgent-care clinics ill-equipped to treat Ebola

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

 
British royal couples’ 2nd child due in April

By The Associated Press | From Page: B2

 
.

Opinion

Spering kept youth league going

By Letter to the Editor | From Page: A11, 8 Comments

 
Day, Blankenchip good for respective cities

By Letter to the Editor | From Page: A11, 1 Comment

‘Misleading’ mailer sent to residents

By Letter to the Editor | From Page: A11

 
.

Living

Community Calendar: Oct. 21, 2014

By Susan Hiland | From Page:

 
.

Entertainment

Yearwood, Santana to perform at World Series

By The Associated Press | From Page: B6

 
Standing ovation at Met Opera despite protest

By The Associated Press | From Page: B6 | Gallery

Still the Same: Bob Seger launching tour, album

By The Associated Press | From Page: B6 | Gallery

 
San Francisco radio stations ban hit song ‘Royals’

By The Associated Press | From Page: B6

Pitbull to host American Music Awards on Nov. 23

By The Associated Press | From Page: B6

 
‘Buffy the Vampire Slayer’ actor arrested in Idaho

By The Associated Press | From Page: B6

NBC’s Snyderman faces credibility issues

By The Associated Press | From Page: B6 | Gallery

 
Not so fast cordcutters – cable’s not going anywhere

By The Associated Press | From Page: B5 | Gallery

TVGrid Oct 21

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: A11

 
.

Sports

Local Report: Armijo boys soccer team falls to Vintage

By Daily Republic staff | From Page: B1

 
Steelers rally past stunned Texans 30-23

By The Associated Press | From Page: B1

Bumgarner against Shields in World Series opener

By The Associated Press | From Page: B1, 1 Comment | Gallery

 
Raiders plagued by 3rd-down defensive woes

By The Associated Press | From Page: B1 | Gallery

Champion drag racer Raymond Beadle dies at 70

By The Associated Press | From Page: B1

 
Stiviano lawsuit against Shelly Sterling dismissed

By The Associated Press | From Page: B1

With TD mark in bag, Manning can set more records

By The Associated Press | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
49ers lose center Daniel Kilgore, needs surgery

By The Associated Press | From Page:

Giants-Royals: A capsule look at World Series

By The Associated Press | From Page: B1

 
Belichick, Brady praise Manning on TD record

By The Associated Press | From Page: B1

Penn State board to meet on disputed Freeh Report

By The Associated Press | From Page: B1

 
McIlroy to skip 2 events to focus on lawsuit

By The Associated Press | From Page: B1

Column: Keselowski marches to his own beat

By The Associated Press | From Page: B1 | Gallery

 
Wanted: Cities interested in hosting 2024 Olympics

By The Associated Press | From Page: B1

Giants rely on core of 4 relievers

By The Associated Press | From Page: B1

 
Royals, fans bond over improbable postseason run

By The Associated Press | From Page: B1

Voynov suspended on domestic violence suspicion

By The Associated Press | From Page:

 
.

Business

Facebook sues law firms, claims fraud

By The Associated Press | From Page: B5

 
Apple reports record 39.3 million iPhone sales

By The Associated Press | From Page: B5, 1 Comment

US regulator: Fannie, Freddie in deal with banks

By The Associated Press | From Page: B5

 
Sears plans to raise more cash via rights offering

By The Associated Press | From Page: B5

Survey: Pay raises rarer despite strong US hiring

By The Associated Press | From Page: B5 | Gallery

 
US agency warns car owners to get air bags fixed

By The Associated Press | From Page: B5

.

Obituaries

.

Comics

Pickles Oct 21

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B6

 
Bridge Oct 21

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B7

Sudoku Oct 21

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B7

 
Baby Blues Oct 21

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B6

Sally Forth Oct 21

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B6

 
Wizard of Id Oct 21

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B6

Dilbert Oct 21

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B6

 
B.C. Oct 21

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B6

Crossword Oct 21

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B7

 
Frank and Ernest Oct 21

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B6

Blondie Oct 21

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B6

 
Word Sleuth Oct 21

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B7

Garfield Oct 21

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B6

 
Get Fuzzy Oct 21

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B6

Baldo Oct 21

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B6

 
Rose is Rose Oct 21

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B6

For Better or Worse Oct 21

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B6

 
Zits Oct 21

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B6

Peanuts Oct 21

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B6

 
Cryptoquote Oct 21

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B7

Beetle Bailey Oct 21

By Daily Republic Syndicated Content | From Page: B6